Early History Years 1742 - 1900
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History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69

 

 

 

HISTORY

 

OF THE

 

LODGE OF UNITY, No 69,

(FOUNDED A.D. 1742)

 

TOGETHER WITH

 

BY-LAWS AND A NOTE ON

FREEMASONRY IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY BLADES, EAST & BLADES,
23, A
BCHURCH LANE, E.C.

1901

-1

 

INTRODUCTION

This electronic book has been created from the original published by the Lodge of Unity, No. 69 in 1900.

We are indebted to the work of Bros. R. J. Reece, Past Master, E. H. Cartwright, Past Master, and G. F. Marshall, Past Master and Secretary, for making this work available as a printed book.

 

We are now able to make their work available to a wider audience.

Bro John Gallagher

Webmaster - LodgeofUnity69.org.uk

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Preface

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of

The LODGE OF UNITY, No. 69. 

  Preface

Lodge of Unity, No. 69 History

T a meeting of the Lodge, held on Monday, February 6th, 1899, at the Inns of Court Hotel, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, W.C., Bros. R. J. Reece, P.M., E. H. Cartwright, P.M., and G. F. Marshall, P.M. and Secretary, were nominated a Committee to revise the by-laws.

While engaged on this revision, the Committee judged the opportunity to be a suitable one for putting on record the history of the Lodge, so far as it could be ascertained.

The old Minute Books show that when meeting at the London Tavern, some fifty years ago, the Lodge was brought into intimate relations with the Lodge of Unity, then No. 215, now No. 183, and with the Frederick Lodge of Unity, at Croydon, then No. 661, now No. 452, under circumstances which will be set forth later.

At the Installation Meeting, on February 5th, 1900, the W. Master and Wardens of these two Lodges attended as guests of the Lodge.

 

 

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The Secretary of the Lodge of Unity No. 183, Bro. G. W. Speth, P.A.G.D.C., the well-known antiquarian and Secretary of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2,076, was also present. In an interesting speech, Bro. Speth sketched the histories of the various Lodges of Unity, dwelling especially on those of No. 183 and No. 69. Always diligent in antiquarian masonic research, it transpired that he had written a history of Lodge No. 183, and had traced, so far as possible, the histories of all the Lodges bearing that name.

The Committee here express their indebtedness to Bro. Speth for information concerning the early period of the Lodge’s existence, also for his interesting note on English Freemasonry at the beginning of the eighteenth century. This latter is quoted in extenso, so necessary is it to a correct understanding of the conditions under which the Lodge was formed.

The loss of the Minutes prior to 1837 leaves a gap which, in spite of every effort of your Committee, remains unfilled. They have taken great pleasure in the compilation of this modest history, and trust that notwithstanding all its faults, it may prove acceptable to the Brethren.

R. J. REECE, P.M.

E. H. CARTWRIGHT, P.M.

G. F. MARSHALL, P.M. and Secretary.

Westminster Palace Hotel,

London, S.W.

October 1st, 1900.

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Note on Freemasonry in the Eighteenth Century

 

NOTE ON FREEMASONRY IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

Note on Freemasonry in the eighteenth CenturyHE following history of Masonry in the eighteenth century is quoted in its entirety from “ The History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 183,” by W. Bro. Speth, P.A.G.D.C.

“Before entering upon the history of our Lodge in particular, some slight sketch of the state of the Craft in general during the eighteenth century will be advisable and convenient, inasmuch as it will materially assist us to understand our real position, and to explain many minutes otherwise incomprehensible.

“Prior to the year A.D. 1716, Masonry existed in various parts of the metropolis and kingdom, and Lodges laboured, so to say, by their own inherent right, meeting at uncertain intervals, electing a Master or President for the occasion, and performing all necessary duties by virtue of their status as Masons. It is even asserted by some writers that, under special circumstances, one Mason might initiate another without any further assistance; but proof of this is wanting.

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“Occasionally, assemblies or gatherings of the whole Craft were held at York, Kilwinning, or other places, but generally each Lodge remained independent of every other; ‘all, however, being virtually knit together as one body, by the rules and regulations contained in the old Charges.⁠1

“As Freemasonry became less operative and more speculative, a visible head and authority appeared more or less necessary. In 1716, there were working in London the four following Lodges, generally known as the Four Old Lodges, and whose history has been most admirably written by Bro. Robert Freke Gould, P.S.G.D.⁠2

  1. The Lodge held at the ‘Goose and Gridiron,’ St. Paul’s Churchyard. 
  2. The Lodge held at the ‘ Crown,’ Parker’s Lane, Drury Lane. 
  3. The Lodge held at the 'Apple-Tree,’ Charles Street, Covent Garden. 
  4. The Lodge held at the ‘Rummer and Grapes,” Channel Row, Westminster. 

"These four met at the ‘Apple-Tree,’ elected a chairman, and constituted themselves a Grand Lodge pro tem., resolving to hold an annual feast, and on that occasion to elect a Grand Master. Accordingly, on the feast of St. John the Baptist, 1717, the feast was held, Bro. Anthony Sayer elected G.M., and Bros. Lamball and Elliot, Grand Wardens.

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1 See Bro. Hughan’s Masonic Register of Lodges (1878)

2 This list is from Bro. Gould’s Four Old Lodges, To these two books I am indebted for most of the information respecting the early history of Freemasonry here detailed. Those who may desire fuller particulars cannot do better than procure copies for themselves.

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“Rules and regulations were subsequently drawn up. The Four Old Lodges were to retain all their old ‘time immemorial’ privileges, but all new Lodges to be legally authorised or warranted by Grand Lodge. 

“This was the first Grand Lodge in the world, and the example of England was soon followed by other countries and districts; as, for instance, Ireland, 1728-9; Scotland, 1736. Many of the pre-existing Lodges joined Grand Lodge, but some continued working on their own undoubted and inherent authority, and these were popularly know as ‘Lodges of St. John.’⁠1

“In 1725 the old Lodge at York started as a Grand Lodge on its own account, but confined its operations chiefly to the northern counties of England, and does not appear to have acted in any unfriendly manner to the Grand Lodge of London. 

“It styled itself, however, the Grand Lodge of all England,’ doubtless because of its prominence in connection with the assemblies of the Craft held in that city for so many centuries. After a time, Lodges, which till then had been known by the name of the tavern at which they met, began to adopt names of their own. 

“Of the Four Old Lodges— 

No. 1 became, and is still known as, the Lodge of Antiquity No. 2. 

No. 2 lapsed about 1736. 

No. 3 became, and is still known as, the Fortitude and Cumberland No. 12. For reasons which, however, do not enter into the scope of this work, it has lost its place of seniority, and is now much lower on the list.

__________

1 Judging from our [i.e., Lodge of Unity, No. 183 ] earliest copy of By-laws, some of these must have been in existence as late as 1781

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“No. 4 is now the Royal Somerset House and Inverness No. 4,  perhaps better known as the “ Old Horn” 

“About 1750 a difference arose in Grand Lodge, which resulted in a secession and the formation of a rival Grand Lodge. This Lodge called itself the Grand Lodge of England, according to the Old Constitution, or, more familiarly, the ‘Antients.’

“The original Grand Lodge was, perforce, constrained to accept the title of ‘Modern’ and these two names, although obviously mis-leading, are those usually employed.

“The Antients also sometimes called themselves York Masons, and even adopted some part of the armorial bearings of the Masonic authorities at York, but apparently without sufficient reason. They are also known as the Atholl Masons, having been presided over by the third and fourth Dukes of Atholl. 

“In 1777 the Lodge of Antiquity (or a majority of its members) quarrelled with the Grand Lodge, and in 1778 asserted their old and inherent privileges, disconnected themselves from Grand Lodge, and ultimately came to an agreement with the Grand Lodge of all England held at York, and styled themselves the Grand Lodge of England south of the River Trent. The minority remained as the Lodge of Antiquity No. 1, under the Grand Lodge (Moderns).

“There were thus four Grand Lodges at work—the Moderns, the Grand Lodge at York, the Antients, and the Lodge South of Trent. The Grand Lodge of York collapsed about 1790.

“In 1790, also, Grand Lodge revoked its proceedings of 1778-9 and the Lodge of Antiquity resumed its work under the Grand Lodge of England. Thus the last formed of the four Grand Lodges ceased working, leaving only two in the field.

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“In 1813, the two rival Grand Lodges, presided over by H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex (Moderns) and H.R.H. the Duke of Kent (Antients), effected an amicable union, since which date there has been only one Masonic authority in this kingdom”

SYNOPTIC SUMMARY OF ENGLISH GRAND LODGES.

1717 The “ Four Old Lodges ” constituted themselves a Grand Lodge."

1725 The Old Lodge of York became a “ Grand Lodge of all England.”

1750 The former of the above divided into two Grand Lodges:

(a) The Seceders—

“ The Grand Lodge of England according to the old Constitution,” or the “Antients.” Also known as “ Atholl ” or “ York ” Masons.

(b) The Originals —

“ The Grand Lodge of England ” or the “ Moderns,” sometimes called the “ Premier,” or “ Regular,” or “ Constitutional ” Grand Lodge.

1778 The Lodge of Antiquity seceded from the “Moderns,” and formed the “ Grand Lodge of England South of the Trent.”

Thus in 1778 there were four Grand Lodges working, viz.:— 

  1. The Moderns.
  2. The Antients.
  3. The Grand Lodge of all England (York).
  4. The Grand Lodge of England South of the Trent.

Of these, No. 4 ceased working in 1790, and about the same time No. 3 collapsed, leaving only the “ Antients ” and “ Moderns,” who in 1813 amalgamated and formed the “ United Grand Lodge of England.”

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Lodge of Unity, No. 69

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HISTORY OF THE LODGE OF UNITY, No. 69

HISTORY OF THE LODGE OF UNITY, No. 69.

History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69

WING to the unfortunate paucity of records, the early history of this Lodge is to a large extent a matter of conjecture and inference.

On referring to the invaluable Masonic Records of the late Bro. John Lane, P.A.G.D.C., we learn that the Lodge was constituted on April 13th 1742, under the Premier Grand Lodge of England (the “ Moderns ”), and bore the No. 190.

The numbers assigned to it at successive enumerations were as follows: —

1755
1770
1780
1781
1792
1814
1814*
1863
122
96
79
79
72
96
82
69

Our present warrant is a “warrant of confirmation’ issued on April 24th, 1824, in response to a petition of the brethren of the

* This was the first roll of the United Grand Lodge of England, which was formed in December 1813, by the amalgamation of the “Premier,” or “Regular,” or “Constitutional” Grand Lodge (the “Moderns”) with the “Atholl” Grand Lodge (“York Masons” or “Antients.”)

 

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Lodge, in which they stated that the original warrant had been lost. Now, the earliest warrant known to us as delivered by the Grand Lodge of England bears the date of 1754, hence it may be suspected that when our Lodge was constituted it had no actual warrant, and it is possible that none was issued until 1824, when the brethren, noting the absence of a warrant, concluded that it must have been lost. It is, of course, equally possible that a warrant may have existed, and have been lost at some time prior to 1824.

The migrations of our Lodge have been more frequent than those of almost any other English Lodge. The following list of its places of meeting is transcribed from Bro. Lane's work (sup. cit.):

“Hoop and Grapes,”

Greek Street, Soho

1742

“Hoop and Grapes,”

Coventry Street, Haymarket

1743

“King’s Arms,”

Wellclose Square

1756

“Hoop and Grapes,”

Coventry Street, Haymarket

1757

“White Swan,”

Grafton Street, Soho

1758

“Two Chairmen,”

Charing Cross

1764

“The Tower,”

New Bond Street

1777

“Two Chairmen,”

Charing Cross

1781

“Horse and Dolphin,”

St. Martin’s Street, Leicester Square

1785

“Barn,”

St. Martin’s Lane

1786

“Repository Coffee House,”

Little St. Martin’s Lane

1788

“Porcupine,”

Newport Street,Newport Market

1794

“Thistle and Crown,”

Suffolk Street

1796

“Anchor and Vine,”

Buckingham Court, Charing Cross.

1800

“Duke’s Court,”

St. Martin’s Lane

1802

“Star and Garter Tavern,”

St. Martin’s Lane

1803

“Coach and Horses,”

Castle Street, Leicester Square

1805

“Black Prince,”

Chandos Street, St. Martin’s Lane

1807

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“Garrick’s Head,”

Bow Street,Covent Garden

1808

“Lord Cochrane,”

Spring Gardens, Charing Cross

1810

“Wheatsheaf Tavern,”

Strand

1812

“Two Angels and Crown,”

Little St. Martin’s Lane

1813

“Percy Arms,”

Church Street, Strand

1818

“Shakespeare Tavern,”

Great Russell Street, Covent Garden

1824

“Ship Tavern,”

Gate Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields

1826

“Essex Head,”

Essex Street, Strand

1831

“George and Dragon,”

Greek Street

1833

“Bedford Head,”

Maiden Lane, Covent Garden

1833

“London Tavern,”

Bishopsgate Street

1836

“Inns of Court Hotel,”

Lincoln’s Inn Fields

1876

“Westminster Palace Hotel,”

Victoria Street

1899

_____________________

According to Bro. Speth, the learned Secretary of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge, our Lodge, as was common at that time, was not at first distinguished by any name, but in 1758 it adopted that of “ The Old French Lodge.”

For many of the following notes and conjectures on the origin of the Lodge, we are again indebted to Bro. Speth, who has carefully investigated the history of the French Lodges in London.

The Union French Lodge is noted in the registers of Grand Lodge as frequenting the “ Hoop and Grapes,” Greek Street, Soho, in 1741, and the “ Cardigan,” Charing Cross, in 1742.

It therefore removed from the former house either at the end of 1741 or the beginning of 1742.

As already stated, our Lodge was constituted at the “ Hoop and Grapes,” on April 13th, 1742; therefore, in one sense at least, it took

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the place just vacated by the Union French Lodge. Still, the brethren forming the Lodge might have been a distinct set of men, and so far there would only be a coincidence to record

In 1758, however, it took the name of “ The Old French Lodge ” ; this was five years after the Union French Lodge had surrendered its warrant, and become extinct. There was no other French Lodge in existence at that time in England.

The question naturally suggests itself, why did it take that name if not to indicate its connection in some form or other with the Union French Lodge?

It may not unreasonably be considered that the title “ Old ” was used to signify “formerly ” the French Lodge, and not the mere antiquity of the Lodge per se as it was at that date only sixteen years old.

In the absence of any other suggestion, the deduction made is a reasonable one. There is yet further support for this contention, for not long afterwards (in 1777, according to Bro. Speth, but, as we shall see later, more probably in 1764) the name of the Lodge was altered to that of “ Unity.”

The former French Lodge had been called “ The Union French Lodge,” and “ Unity ” and “ Union ” are so similar that it appears quite probable that the one was meant as a substitute for the other. By this time there were more French Lodges existing, one of which styled itself “ The Ancient French Lodge,” and it is permissible to suppose that our Lodge took the name of “ Unity ” in order to mark a distinction.

On this point Bro. Speth writes to us as follows:—“ If ‘ Union ’ had been regarded as a French title of the former Lodge (and we

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know it was so regarded by its daughter in Frankfort, which was called indiscriminately ‘Union’ in French minutes, and ‘Einigkeit’ in German minutes), then ‘ Unity ’ would be the correct translation; just as Einigkeit does not render the English word ‘ Union,’ but does properly translate ‘ Unity.’

“ The English word ‘ Union ’ translated into German would be Vereinigung, not Einigkeit. My suggestion is that about 1742 the Union French Lodge probably numbered many English members, and that in 1742 they decided to separate into two Lodges, the English party applying for a new constitution, and the French removing to new quarters.

“That in 1758, as the Union had died out, your Lodge determined to accentuate a claim to be considered as its survival in a measure, and that the further change to ‘Unity’ in 1777 only tends to confirm this suggestion.

“ It is all pure conjecture, but not quite baseless, and I doubt whether we shall ever get any nearer the truth.”

With regard to the date at which the name of “ Unity ” was adopted, Bro. Speth appears to us to be in error in fixing it as 1777. A series of lithographed annual lists of Lodges, with their places and dates of meeting, was printed during a succession of years in the middle of the last century. In the earlier volumes some Lodges are named and some are not From the years 1765 to 1775 (both inclusive), all Lodge names are systematically omitted, while after the latter date the names re-appear. In the volume for 1764 our Lodge is entered as “ The Old French Lodge,” while in that for 1776, it appears as “ The Lodge of Unity.” The change, therefore, took place during this interval. If we now turn to the Grand Lodge Registers, we find that the systematic registration of new members of Lodges commenced

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in the year 1768. Lodges had previously been requested to register their members from time to time after 1730, but little or no attention was paid to these requests.

The list of the members of the “Lodge of Unity” begins with eighteen brethren, against all of whose names is set the date June 14th, 1764. It seems to us that here is a strong indication that this was the date of the adoption of the new name; possibly the Old French Lodge, having got into difficulties, received an influx of new members, and was revived under a new name on the date in question.

The list of eighteen names referred to is as follows: —

John Mercer, Senr., Newsman.

John Evans, Turncock.

Hele Legg, Carpenter.

John Mercer, Junr., Carver and Gilder.

Matthew Murray, Chandler (Tallow).

William Lord, Vintner.

John Smith, Victualler.

Thomas Capel, Carver and Gilder.

William Hayward, Peruke-maker.

James Brown, Cook.

James Smith, Gent.

Adam Hanson, Gent.

William Soper, Victualler.

John Foxhall, Gent.

William Clay, Victualler.

John Carpenter, Taylor.

——Pindar, Victualler.

Richard Wilson, Coachman.

The next member entered is Charles Watts, Musician. 31st May, 1780.

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It will thus be seen that the majority of the members were tradesmen.

For a long time they were drawn from the same class, almost every conceivable trade being represented; thus we find a Baker, Plumber, Publican, Hatter, Printer, Trowel-maker, Wine Merchant, Cabinet-maker, Coal Merchant, Surgeon, Taylor, Cheesemonger, Lace- weaver, Broker, Shoemaker, Silver Smith, Jeweller, Japanner, Butcher, Fishmonger, Mariner, Watchmaker, Brazier, Embroiderer, Oilman, Plaisterer, Hairdresser, Cordwainer, Bricklayer, and Racket Stringer. Later we have Boot Maker, Glass Manufacturer, Hosier, Leatherseller, Auctioneer, Glover, Stationer, Artificial Flower Maker, Horse-dealer, Apothecary, Haberdasher, Pencil Maker, Bookbinder, Pipe-maker, Cutler, Dyer, Sadler, Shopkeeper, and so on.

The brethren for the greater part resided in the neighbouring districts; thus we find their addresses in Pall Mall, Newport Market, Covent Garden, New Bond Street, Westminster, Soho, Lambeth, Leicester Square, Goodge Street, Long Acre, Seven Dials, etc., though one of the early members hailed from Knightsbridge, while another had his address so far away as Dominica, West Indies.

This register of members has been continued with presumable completeness until the present time, but beyond it and the signature books at Grand Lodge for the principal officers of private Lodges (which were instituted in 1819, and only recently abolished), there is no further source of information until April 13th, 1836, the date of the first entry in the oldest Minute Book of our Lodge that is now extant.

In 1834, the publication of the “ Freemasons’ Quarterly Review ” was commenced. In 1855 it became a monthly, but in 1858 it ceased

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to exist It contained, among other matters, occasional reports of Lodge meetings; and from time to time those of the Lodge of Unity are noticed—usually the Installation Meetings.

Fortunately, a very full report is given of the Centenary Celebration in 1842. To this we shall refer later, but it will be well to quote now what is there stated as to the early days of the Lodge. The writer remarks on “ the great difficulty after the lapse of a century in tracing its early history,” and it is no wonder that we find it even more difficult now. He states that “ the Lodge was constituted on April 13th, 1742, at the King’s Arms, Wellclose Square,” but this, as we have seen, is a mistake.

He goes on to say that “ the early records of the Lodge, as well as the names of its founders, are lost,” and that “ the first records extant are of the date 1764, but not much is to be learnt from them.”

He makes, however, the following notes:

“In 1764 the rules, orders, and laws were such as were usually in operation in the Craft.

“The Lodge met on the second and fourth Thursday from Michaelmas to Lady Day, and on the second Thursday only from Lady Day to Michaelmas.*⁠1 The hour of meeting was 6 p.m. in winter, and 7 p.m. in summer.

“No brother was admitted or allowed to drink a public health unclothed. Penalty, 3d.

“Contributions were 3s. a quarter. Joining fee, 3s. 6d.

__________

1 * On referring to the old lithographed lists of Lodges, we find that in 1764 the days of meeting are given as the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of every month. A year or two later they appear as having been changed to the 2nd and 4th Thursdays in winter and the 2nd Thursday in summer. In 1776 they are given as the 2nd Thursday at all seasons. When they were next changed cannot be ascertained.

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“The summons was to be a clear day’s notice.

“Disguise in liquor, immodest language, etc., to exclude a brother from the meeting.

“The landlord to furnish three or more small candles ; and a slate for the J.W. to keep an account of the liquor.

“The landlord not to speak, except as to the reckoning.

“Visitor’s fee, is. 6d. If a St. John’s man, 2s.

“Master’s Lodges for Raisings: —The money received for the ceremony, and the nightly is. 6d. to be applied to the supper, to which visitors were admitted gratis.”

He tells us that in 1774 a sick fund was established, and gives a synopsis of its rules. It apparently died out in or about 1778. The report continues: —“ The Lodge memoranda seemed to have ceased until 1790, when meetings became more regular, and the lectures were regularly explained in a Sunday Lodge of Instruction at the ‘ Crown,’ Duke’s Court.”

Then many changes occurred, and the Lodge seems to have fallen on evil days, but “ at length Bro. Richard Lea Wilson joined, and with a few zealous friends, rallied its expiring embers, and moved it to the ‘ London Tavern,’ where it has become gradually re-animated, and takes a lead equally by the respectability of its members, as by their masonic interpretation of social qualities; still more so, by their steady discipline and practice.”

As already mentioned, the first entry in the Minute Book is dated April 13th, 1836, when the Lodge met at the “Bedford Head,” Maiden Lane, Covent Garden. This was a Wednesday, and at that

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time the Regular Meetings were held on the second Wednesday in each month from October to May (both included), the installation being in January.

The first few pages of this book contain a list of names, evidently of members of the Lodge, with the address and description of each, and apparently the date of his initiation or joining.

The earliest date thus recorded is October 10th, 1832, and the latest December 3rd, 1860. We find, however, from the Minutes, that between these dates the list is not complete, the names of several brethren who became members between 1841 and 1845 not appearing in it. Most of the names are scored through, probably to signify that membership had ceased, by death or otherwise.

On May 11th, 1836, it is recorded that a brother resigned, “ when his Grand and private Lodge certificates were given to the Tyler to take to him.” Apparently in those days, before the introduction of the penny post, it was customary for the Tyler to deliver the various Lodge notices at the addresses of the members, to collect outstanding subscriptions, and in other ways to be the messenger and servant of the Lodge.

On June 8th, 1836, at what would appear to have been an Emergency meeting, it was decided to remove the Lodge to the “ London Tavern,” Bishopsgate Street.

The first meeting held at the new house was an Emergency meeting, called on the requisition of four members, on July 7th, 1836, “ to enable the brethren to express their congratulations to the Most Worshipful the Grand Master on the ocasion (sic) of his restoration to sight.” The address then adopted is set out in full in the Minute Book, and in the Minutes of the next meeting, October 12th, 1836, is

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entered the reply of the Grand Master, H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, thanking the members of the Lodge for their “ brotherly and affectionate address ”

The Minutes of the year 1836 are duly signed by the W.M., Bro. John Jones; after that year it is the exception to find them signed until the year 1855. It is interesting to note that the signature then appended is that of Bro. Joseph Stearns (acting W.M.), the father of our present Treasurer; subsequently they are nearly all signed.

Bro. Richard Lea Wilson, described as a silk manufacturer, joined on July 10th, 1832. As we learn from the “Freemasons’ Quarterly Review ” (vide supra) he was the prime mover in the revival of the Lodge from a state of decrepitude. He had apparently filled the Chair in another Lodge, and in our Lodge held the office of Chaplain, when at a meeting on April 12th, 1837, it was unanimously resolved, “ that Bro. R. L. Wilson should rank as a Past Master of this Lodge, and possess, enjoy, and exercise all benefits and advantages thereunto belonging, and as belong to Past Masters of this Lodge generally.”

It is questionable whether such a resolution, even in those days, was allowable under the Constitutions ; it certainly would not be so at the present time. However, it served its purpose as a graceful compliment to the Brother.

Although never Master of our Lodge, we find Bro. Wilson occupying the Chair temporarily on many occasions, and in 1837 he even signed the Grand Lodge book as W.M., Bro. Greville Jones being the actual Master at the time. He was undoubtedly an enthusiastic Mason, and from the first his example stimulated the others, for in “The Freemason’s Quarterly Review” of 1838, we read: “The brethren [of the Lodge of Unity] when not occupied by ceremonies,

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employ themselves in working sections ; we have particularly to record the excellence of their mode of doing so on February 14th, when the Chair was taken by Bro. R. Lea Wilson, G.L.S⁠1

The Minutes of that meeting record that Mr. Thomas Howell was initiated, and Bro. Stevens passed. The Lodge was then closed to the First Degree, and the whole of the Seven Sections of the First Lecture worked by the following brethren, the questions being put by the W.M. fro tern., Bro. Richd. Lea Wilson, P.M. and Chaplain, with the exception of the 4th and 5th, which were put by Bro. Udall, W.M. of No. 10.⁠2

1st Section by Bro. W. Thodey Smith.

2nd and 3rd Sections by Bro. Henry Udall, W.M., No. 10.

4th and 5th Sections by Bro. R. Lea Wilson, P.M.

6th and 7th Sections by Bro. P. Fuller, S.W., No. 194.⁠3

The Minutes conclude in the usual terms: “ The Lodge was closed in antient form, and with solemn prayer in Peace, Harmony, and Brotherly Love, about ten o’clock.”

On November 26th, 1838, Bro. R. L. Wilson was elected Treasurer, which office he held until 1852, when he resigned his membership of the Lodge under circumstances that will be mentioned later. From 1842 until his resignation, he also filled the office of Secretary. It is now contrary to the Constitutions for one Brother to hold two regular offices. During all this time the Minutes show

__________

1 We are at a loss to know what the interpretation of these letters is. Can they mean “Grand Lodge Steward?”

2 Probably a brother of the John Udall who became Master of the Lodge in the Centenary year.

3 Bro. Fuller afterwards joined the Lodge in 1841, and resigned in 1843.

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that he was one of the most prominent and active members of the Lodge. From the commencement of the extant Minutes (excluding a few occasions when no list of those present is given), he appears to have been absent on only three occasions, viz., in May and December, 1836, and October, 1837. After the latter date, until he resigned, he is recorded as having attended every meeting of the Lodge. It is noteworthy that in the Minutes of February 7th, 1848, he is referred to as “ Bro. R. Lea Wilson, P.M., Representative from the G.L. of Ireland, P.S.G.W., Surrey, etc.” On April 5th, 1847, he is styled “ P.S.G.W. and Representative G.L., Ireland,” but on every other occasion he is merely credited with his Lodge rank. It is therefore presumable that in the years 1847-8 he held office as S.G.W. of Surrey.

At the meeting of the Lodge on January 11th, 1837, it was resolved “ that the salary of the Tyler be raised to 7s. 6d. per meeting, and that the usual Christmas-box of £1 is. be presented to him.”

It is recorded that at this meeting a Past Master’s jewel, voted by the Lodge, was presented to the outgoing Master, Bro. John Jones.

It was further resolved “ that a master of the ceremonies be appointed, and a jewel and collar be provided for him.” Bro. W. Vink was then appointed to this office by the W.M.

In January, 1838, the audit committee, noting in their report that there was a debit balance of £3 15s. 7d. due to the Treasurer, and arrears outstanding to the amount of £23 4s., “ advise the brethren to raise the joining fee to two guineas, and the initiation fee to five guineas⁠1.” They conclude their report by congratulating the members on the state and prospects of the Lodge, which they find to be more

__________

1 Previously Ten shillings and Four and a half guineas respectively.

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prosperous than at any other period during its existence of nearly a century, but remind the brethren that “ the only way to keep it so is to get in the present arrears without loss of time, and in future to insist on the subscriptions⁠1 (which are very small) being paid on the subscription night, viz., in October and February, or as soon after as the brethren may attend the Lodge.”

On January 10th, 1838, it was resolved that “ the recommendations be acted upon, and be considered as part of the By-laws of the Lodge.”

In May it was decided that in future the subscriptions should be paid in one sum, in the month of January: at the present time it is payable in October.

At the same meeting, on Bro. R. L. Wilson’s proposal, it was resolved: “ That the future meetings of this Lodge be held on the last Monday in the month, instead of the second Wednesday.” This did not come into operation until the meeting in the following March, which was held on Monday, the 27th.

At this period of its existence, the Lodge was a supper Lodge; that is to say, the brethren met and opened the Lodge at seven o’clock, and, after closing it, went to supper at about nine o’clock— this is shown by occasional entries in the Minutes.

Notes of the cash received and expended appear in most of the Minutes in 1838 and 1839, from which it appears that the cost of these suppers varied from 5s. to 7s. 6d. per head.

At the meeting on Monday, October 29th, 1838, the following resolutions, proposed by Bro. R. L. Wilson, were unanimously carried:

“ That the lodge be altered from a supper to a dinner Lodge. That

__________

1 Two pounds per annum.

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in order not to increase the Subscription at present, the Lodge should (sic) meet for the future in the months of October, December, February, and April only, as the regular meetings of the Lodge, the election of W.M. and Treasurer to take place in December, the Installation in February. That in order to keep the Lodge out of debt, if, on consultation with the Treasurer, the W.M. should at any time think it advisable, he may order each Bro. attending the Banquet, either at a Special or Regular meeting, to pay 15 s. to the funds of the Lodge.”

The new arrangement came into force at once, except that the first subsequent meeting was held on November 26th, instead of in December. On this occasion the Lodge was opened at four o’clock, called to refreshment about six, and after the banquet called on and closed about 9.30 p.m. Until 1850 (when the Minutes ceased to record it), the hour of meeting was nearly always four o’clock, the Lodge being closed sometimes before, and sometimes after, dinner.

The change resulted in the house bill being considerably increased ; on November 26th it was £9 7s. for eleven brethren, or 17s. per head, and on January 25th, 1859, £25 3s. for twenty-three, or 22s. per head. The amount is never subsequently entered in the Minute Book, but the entries in the Treasurer’s book seem to show that for a long time the cost continued about the same.

The final change in the dates of meeting was made on December 27th, 1841, when it was resolved to meet on the first Monday in October, December, February, and April. These are the dates of meeting at the present time.

The following references to the Lodge are found in the “ Freemasons’ Quarterly Review ” of this period. The first occurs in a

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report of the Installation Meeting in 1839, and  the second in connection with that of 1840.“Among the secrets of Masonry, and by no means an unimportant one, the divulging of which would be of public advantage to the Craft, is that of conducting sumptuous dinner- banquets on an annual subscription of two guineas.” “ This may be called almost a family Lodge, as there belong to it four Brothers Vink, two Brothers Wilson, and two Brothers Vickers. Practical economy still presides in the Lodge. Its subscription is still limited to 2 guineas, yet its banquets are equal to any in the Craft. Bro. R. L. Wilson should publish his secret for the benefit of the Craft.”

As a matter of fact, these “ sumptuous dinner-banquets ” with the small subscription, brought the Lodge rather heavily into debt. (See Appendix on the Financial Progress of the Lodge.)

Turning back to the Minutes of April 30th, 1838, we find a note of a resolution to purchase a Treasurer’s Collar and Jewel, also a Senior Warden’s Collar and Jewel, to replace those that are missing.

At the same meeting it was moved by Bro. Richard Lea Wilson, seconded by Bro. Richards, S.W., and carried unanimously, “ That the Lodge of Unity, No. 82, understanding that a new Lodge is about to be formed and constituted at Croydon, in Surrey, under the Rt. Hon. the Lord Monson, the Rt. W. Prov. Grand Master for that County, has great pleasure in offering to his Lordship and the Members of that Lodge, the use of their furniture at the consecration, or at any time that it may be of service to them, until they shall have procured their own, or of affording any other assistance in their power, it being their opinion that it is the duty of all Lodges to endeavour to promote the interests of Masonry by every means in their power, and by none more so than by reciprocating kind offices to each other.”

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The copy of a letter from the Secretary of the Frederick Lodge of Unity, No. 661, records a resolution unanimously passed at a meeting of the Lodge at the “ Greyhound,1” Croydon, on June 22nd, 1838, expressing cordial thanks to the Brethren of the Lodge of Unity “ for the earnest zeal displayed by them in promoting the prosperity of Freemasonry, and particularly for their kindness evinced towards this Lodge in lending it their furniture and jewels.”

The Frederick Lodge held meetings while our Lodge was in recess—possibly it was a summer Lodge—and in consequence we find several instances recorded where initiates of one Lodge were advanced in the other.

On April 27th, 1840, it was unanimously resolved, “ That at any time during the recess of the Lodge of Unity, No. 82, any candidate may be ballotted for and initiated in the Frederick Lodge of Unity, No. 661, Croydon, as if in and for this Lodge, without calling a Lodge of Emergency, but in such case a summons of the Frederick Lodge shall be sent to every member of this Lodge, stating particulars, and that the candidate is for this Lodge ; if five or more members of Lodge No. 82 attend the Frederick Lodge, they alone shall ballot; if not five, the ballot of the Frederick Lodge shall be considered sufficient, and if not three black balls, the candidate may be initiated in the Frederick Lodge, No. 661, for the Lodge of Unity, No. 82.”

It is, of course, by no means uncommon for a Brother who has been initiated in one Lodge to be advanced in another of which he is not a member, but the above resolution as to ballotting is certainly unusual, if not unique, and shows the close relationship of the two Lodges at this time. How long it remained in force we cannot say; there is no record in the Minutes of its ever having been rescinded, but it probably lapsed automatically, as it was not incorporated in the new by-laws of 1856.

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The last instance recorded in our Minutes of a member of the one Lodge being advanced in the other, is in 1858, when Bro. Bridges was initiated in our Lodge in April, passed in the Frederick Lodge in July, and raised in our Lodge in October.

There was also another Lodge with which we were about this time on terms of reciprocity, for on December 27th, 1841, it was decided, under a recommendation of the Permanent Committee, “ That all members of the Lodge of Honour and Generosity, No. 194, be admitted members of Lodge No. 82, without joining fee (subject to the ballot), that Lodge having arranged to meet on the alternate first Mondays, viz., in the months of November, March and May, and to admit all members of the Lodge of Unity, No. 82, on the same conditions.”

On the same evening, four brethren of No. 194 were elected members of the Lodge of Unity, one of them being Bro. Hugh P. Fuller, who is mentioned above as taking part in the Lodge working on February 14th, 1838.

From time to time other similar admissions are recorded. There is a case of a Brother joining us from No. 194 as late as in December, 1854, but whether he came under the above rule we cannot tell; the Treasurer’s book, being, at that time, as will be shown later, in a state of chaos, does not help us.

In April, 1838, Bro. Edward Frederick Leeks, of the Moira Lodge, No. 109, was elected a joining member. In the same year he signed the Grand Lodge book as Junior Warden, although the real occupant of that chair was Bro. Wm. Vink, who signed as Senior Warden, which would tend to show that the signature books are not always trustworthy.

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The list on the front pages of the Minute Book records the fact that Bro. Leeks was a solicitor, of No. 2, Walbrook, which address is afterwards altered to 18, New Bridge Street, E.C.

He would appear to have been a man of some eminence, or at least of popularity, for in the “ Freemasons’ Quarterly Review ” we find a report of a public meeting held in 1844, at which he was presented with a service of silver; this, however, was not in connection with Masonry. He became Junior Warden of the Lodge in 1839, and served the same office again the following year. He was installed as Master on February 22nd, 1841, and resigned his membership in 1850, but rejoined in February, 1853, under the terms of a special resolution which enabled him and another Past Master to do so " on the reduced amount of subscription ” then instituted for the benefit of those who could not often attend the meetings. He continued an active member for many years, taking a prominent part in the affairs of the Lodge, and finally tendered his resignation, which was accepted “ with great regret,” on April 3rd, 1865.

The next matter of interest with which we have to deal is the celebration of the Centenary of the Lodge, in 1842. The first mention of this occurs in a report in the “ Freemasons’ Quarterly,” where we are told that on January 25th, 1839, “the members entered into an arrangement to conduct their Centenary, which will be completed in 1842, in a spirited manner.” No reference is made to this in the Minutes of the meeting, so presumably it was an after-dinner determination.

The question was formally brought before the Lodge on December 27th, 1841, in the report of the Permanent Committee, which was unanimously adopted and ordered to be acted upon. Its recommendations were as follows: —

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“That as the Lodge of Unity, No. 82, will arrive at its Centenary, April 13th, 1842, the following course be adopted in its celebration.

“That it should take place on the exact day of the original issue of the warrant, viz., 13th April, instead of the usual meeting in that month.

“That Bro. Jno. Udall, having handsomely offered, if elected W.M., to give 20 guineas towards the funds, his offer be accepted (subject to the ballot), and he be allowed to have ten visitors free of expense.

“That every member paying 2 guineas shall be entitled to one ticket for himself, not transferable, and one for any Brother he may like to invite. Any other visitors that may be invited by individual members, the members inviting to pay 1 guinea each for them.

“That the Wardens of the Lodge pay 3 guineas each, the Deacons 2 guineas, and every other officer 1 guinea, besides their 2 guineas as members.

“That each of the Grand or Past Grand Officers or other distinguished visitors, as the Permanent Committee see proper, should be invited at the expense of the Lodge.

“That honorary jewels be presented to the ________ last Masters⁠1 who have passed the Chair of the Lodge, as a token of esteem and regard, and to mark so auspicious an event.”

The ballot for the Master was taken the same evening, and was unanimous in Bro. Udall’s favour, and at the following meeting on February 7th, 1842, he was duly installed by Bro. R. Lea Wilson.

Bro. Udall’s selection to fill the Chair on this occasion is certainly curious ; he would seem to have joined the Lodge with this object in 

__________

1 A blank is left here with the evident intention to fill in the number afterwards.

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view, for it was only on April 26th, 1841, that, on the proposal of the W.M., Bro. E. F. Leeks, seconded by Bro. R. L. Wilson, he was elected a joining member.

In the Minutes of that meeting he is described as “of the Westminster and Keystone, No. 10, and several other Lodges.” Probably he was a Past Master of one or more of them, but the fact is not recorded. What he was outside Masonry we do not know, as his name does not appear in the list at the beginning of our Minute Book.

The Centenary Meeting was duly held on April 13th, 1842, at three o’clock precisely, and there were present: —

Bro. John Udall, W.M.

Bro. Richd. Lea Wilson, P.M., Treasurer and Secretary.

Bro. Wm. Thodey Smith, as S.W.⁠1

Bro. Jas. Vickers, J.W.

Bro. the Rev. Charles Vink, Chaplain.

Bro. Edward Vickers, S.D.

Bro. Thomas Gilson, J.D.

Bro. James Clark, I.G.

Bro. Nicholson, S.S.⁠2

Bro. Walmsley, J.S.⁠3

Together with eleven other members and fifty-one visitors. Among the latter were : —

Bro. H. Lewis, Pr. Gd. Master, Sumatra.

Bro. David Pollock, P.S.G.W., P.G.R.

Bro. J. H. Hall, Gd. Registrar.

Bro. Geo. Francis, Dep. G.M., Surrey.

__________

1 Bro. Fredk. Vink had been invested as S.W. in February, but appears to have been absent from this meeting, his chair being occupied by Bro. Smith, who properly was “ M.C.” Bro. Smith, as well as Bro. Chas. Vink, resigned the Lodge on October 3rd, 1842,

2 Evidently Senior  Steward.

3 Evidently Junior Steward.

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And eight other Present or Past Grand Officers ; also: —

Bro. J. G. H. Burmester, Repres. G.L., Hambro’ (sic), and Bro. Hy. Chas. Sirr, Repres. G.L., Ireland.

A raising and two initiations were done, and the Seven Sections of the First Lecture worked.

The Minutes end abruptly without any record of the closing of the Lodge, but the meeting was reported in the “ Freemasons’ Quarterly Review,” and there we read: “ The banquet was at seven, and was followed by many toasts and a concert. One of the toasts was ‘The Memory of the Forefathers of the Lodge.’ ” In the concert one of the items was a Masonic Ode, specially written for the occasion, and set to music by one of the brethren, the words of which were as follows: —

MASONIC ODE. (April 13th, 1842.)

Quartettte and

Chorus

Hail,Brothers, hail, auspicious is the day;

Our theme is mirth; bid sordid care away.

Alto Solo and Quartette.—

What magic spell unites our band.
The faithful heart, the fervent hand,
While fortune’s stream unequalled flows
To soothe a hapless brother’s woes.

Bass Solo and Chorus.—

A hundred rolling years have fled
Since Light masonic to us sped ;
May hundreds yet revolving prove 
In Unity fraternal love.

Tenor Solo, Duet and Chorus.—

Our sons shall grace this festive board,
And this their joyous toast shall be—
“ Our fathers’ Lodge—The Unity.”

Quartette.—

My brothers, in unity let us combine
In praises of Masonry, science divine ;
Sigh not for time, though our moments be few,
We’ll pledge in bright brimmers to hearts good and true

Chorus.—

Our fathers’ Lodge—The Unity.

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The Centenary was thus duly celebrated in 1842, but the Centenary Warrant was not issued until December 22nd, 1868; to this we shall refer later.

At the meeting on February 6th, 1843, it was resolved: “That a Jewel or some other token of the respect of the Lodge be presented to Bro. Jno. Udall, P.M., not only as a mark of their regard, but as a memento of the highly munificent and admirable manner in which he presided over the Lodge during the year of their Centenary.” There is no mention of any such presentation in the Minutes, but the Treasurer’s book shows that a Jewel was procured, its cost being 7 guineas.

The Minutes record that on December 2nd, 1844, it was unanimously resolved: “ That the Lodge of Unity, No. 82, having been informed that a new Lodge is about to be formed and constituted at Gt. Berkharnpstead, Herts, the Rev. Stephn. Lea Wilson, W.M., has great pleasure in offering to that Lodge the use of their furniture, etc., at the Consecration, or until they have procured their own, being of opinion that it is the duty of Lodges to reciprocate kind offices to each other.” This offer apparently was accepted, for the Treasurer announced, on October 6th, 1845, “that all the furniture of Lodge No. 82 that had been lent to the Berkharnpstead Lodge, No. 742, had been duly returned.”

During the eight years, 1843 to 1850, the Lodge worked quietly on, nothing occurring to disturb its equanimity; the Minutes record eight resignations and the accession of twenty new members. It would seem probable that there were some resignations which were not entered in the books, otherwise the Lodge must have been larger than it was in 1851 and onwards,

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The Centenary year was naturally a good one for attendances, the average of members present at each meeting being seventeen. This was very nearly maintained in the next year, but then came a falling off, the numbers on several occasions falling as low as seven or eight In 1848 and 1849 there was a slight improvement.

On April 6th, 1846, there was initiated in the Lodge “William Munk, Esq., M.D., aged thirty-five, of 2, Finsbury Place South.” He was destined to play a more prominent part in Medicine than in Masonry. A distinguished writer on medical subjects, he was for very many years Librarian to the Royal College of Physicians. He ceased to be a member of the Lodge in 1849, and died on December 20th, 1898, aged eighty-two.

In February, 1847, Bro. R. Lea Wilson, P.M., initiated his nephew, George Lea Wilson, and Installed in the Chair Bro. the Rev. John Edmund Cox, M.A. In view of subsequent proceedings, it may be interesting to note here that Bro. Cox was elected a joining member of the Lodge on December 1st, 1845. He is described in the Minutes as of “6, Oliver Terrace West, Mile End Road, late of the Lodge of United Friends, No. 392, Gt. Yarmouth.”

In the list at the beginning of the book his address is given as 44, Burton Crescent, W.C. In February, 1846, he was Invested as Chaplain and Junior Warden. He was Secretary from August, 1855, to October, 1863, and was Grand Chaplain from April, 1848, to 1858.

He played a prominent part in the stormy period of the Lodge’s existence, while between himself and Bro. Lea Wilson there appears to have been a constant state of friction.

A time of trouble and trial was before the Lodge, and here we may put on record the Lodge history of two members who now come

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into prominence. One of these is Bro. Joseph Stearns, and no one can study the history of the Lodge at this period without coming to the conclusion that to his strict regard for Masonic procedure we are indebted for the Lodge of Unity as we know it to-day.

At a time when other brethren failed in their duty, he stands forth as a man of strong will and determination, resolute to carry the Lodge through a period of turmoil to brighter and more prosperous days. His tact and ability enabled him to do this, and as long as the records of our Lodge exist, he will be regarded as one of the Fathers of the Lodge.

The Minutes record that “ Joseph Stearns, aged forty, stockbroker, of Hercules Passage, and 14, Clayton Street, Kennington Road,” was initiated on February 2nd, 1846. He was presumably Passed in the following month in one of the affiliated Lodges, for at the next meeting of our Lodge, in April, 1846, he was Raised. He became S.W. in 1847, and was Installed as W.M. on February 7th, 1848, by Bro. R. Lea Wilson.

He was Treasurer of the Lodge from 1859 until his death, in 1868, when he was succeeded by his son, Joseph Phillips Stearns, P.M., who holds the Office to this day. He was appointed Secretary in 1859. and filled that post, as well as the Treasurership, until 1866, when Grand Lodge pointed out that under the Constitutions one person could not hold both Offices.

The second Brother is Jeremiah How, described in the Minutes of February 22nd, 1841, on which day he was initiated, as “ aged thirty-five, publisher, of Stroud Green, and 132, Fleet Street.” He was Passed in October, and Raised in December of the same year. In 1845 he became Inner Guard, and in 1846 Senior Deacon. He

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then went out of Office without filling a Warden’s chair; presumably he did so in another Lodge, for in February, 1851, when the W.M. elect, Bro. the Rev. Edward Moore,⁠1 expressed his “ regret that he was unable to serve the Office of W.M. for this year,” the usual course was adopted; that portion of the Minutes referring to his election was not confirmed, and, a new ballot being taken, Bro. How was unanimously elected, and at the next meeting, on April 7th, he was duly Installed in the Chair of the Lodge. In the Minutes of February, 1855, he is referred to as Prov. G.D.C., Surrey. There is nothing to show when his membership of the Lodge ceased.

In the Minutes of December 1st, 1851, we see the first signs of approaching discord. Bro. Cox gave notice of a motion “ That a sum of 5 guineas be granted from the Charity Fund to the case of the widow and children of the late Bro. Pryer,” who apparently was not a member of the Lodge. The Secretary, Bro. R. Lea Wilson, who was opposed to this, gave notice of two “ amendments ” : —

  1. “ That such a vote would contravene the by-laws.”
  2. “ That the fund being intended for the relief of those who are, or have been, members of the Lodge, could not be used for the proposed purpose.”

Bro. Joseph Stearns then gave notice of a motion: —

“ That the by-laws be printed and a copy given to each member⁠2.”

__________

1 Bro. the Rev. Edward Moore, of Brasenose College, Oxford, and Rector of Boughton Malherbe, Kent, Pro. Gd. Chaplain, Oxon, and Chaplain of the Alfred Lodge, No. 425, was elected a Joining Member in December, 1848, Junior Warden in 1849, and Senior Warden in 1850. As above stated, he was elected W.M. in December, 1850, but refused to serve. He resigned the Lodge in October, 1851, in which year he was made Grand Chaplain.

2 At the present time by Rule No. 162, Book of Constitutions, the By-laws of all Lodges must be printed. Printed By-laws were first mentioned in Constitutions in 1884.

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resigning his membership, which caused the motions to be postponed. The W.M., Bro. James Robins, appointed Bro. Jeremiah How, P.M., as Secretary.

Then follow the Minutes of two special meetings of the Permanent Committee (or Committee of Past Masters), which are very painful reading, for in them we appear to find the origin of the attack on Bro. Wilson. It seems that Bro. Cox had stated to certain members of the Lodge that Bro. Wilson had betrayed his trust by taking commissions on the tavern bills. The truth of this the manager of the “London Tavern,” Bro. Bathe,⁠1 emphatically denied; Bro. Cox was unable to bring any evidence in support of his statement, and after much wrangling and mutual recriminations, the whole of the correspondence and discussion were eventually submitted to the Lodge on May 24th, 1852.

It was then resolved by a majority of eight to five, “ That this Lodge ... is satisfied that Bro. Richard Lea Wilson, in his capacity of Treasurer, has never taken or received either commission or discount from Bro. Bathe on the Tavern Bills.” Another resolution to the effect that the late Treasurer’s accounts, and the audit procured by him, were unsatisfactory, was carried by seven to five.

So far as we can judge from the Treasurer’s book, the only fault in Bro. Wilson’s accounts is want of sufficient detail, in that after 1842 the subscriptions, etc., were simply entered in lump sums as “ Cash collected.” His accounts were audited by two or more members of the Committee up to 1843, but in each subsequent year the

__________

1 Bro. William Potts Bathe is stated in the list at the beginning of the Minute Book to have become a Member of the Lodge on February 10th, 1836. He may have influenced the decision to remove to the “ London Tavern” in June of that year, or in view of removing, he may have been elected to Membership of the Lodge. From 1837 to 1848 he was a regular attendant at the meetings, but both before and after that period he only occasionally appears in the list of those present. He never held any office in the Lodge

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Bro. R. Lea Wilson took exception to this, and again proceeded to give notice of two further “ amendments ” : —

  1. “That this proposition being contrary to the by-laws, cannot be put to the Lodge”
  2. “ That members being entitled, both by the Book of Constitutions and the by-laws of the Lodge, to take copies of them when required, as has been done for the last twenty years, it is unnecessary and inexpedient to print them.”

It is only too obvious from these notices that brotherly relations had become somewhat strained.

At the next meeting, February, 1852, the W.M., Bro. How, had the by-laws read, and decided that both the above motions were out of order, as being contrary to the by-laws⁠1.

Bro. Stearns then gave notice of the following motion: —

“That that portion of Clause 16 in the Book of the Bye-laws, which says ‘that these bye-laws shall not be printed’ be expunged, and that in future the bye-laws of Lodge 82 be printed, and a copy given to every member of this Lodge, as is done in most other Lodges”; also “that Clause No. 18 in the Book of Constitutions, under the head Private Lodges, be from henceforth strictly acted upon, and more particularly that portion of the above clause which states “ The accounts of the Lodge shall be audited, at least once in every year, by a committee appointed by the Lodge.”

Bro. Lea Wilson felt aggrieved at these propositions, and when the Lodge again me—April 5th, 1852—a letter was received from him

__________

1 The Treasurer’s book shows that 5 guineas were collected from the brethren “for Pryer’s wife etc,” at this meeting.

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audit is vouched for by the W.M. only. The Committee presented a report on the financial condition of the Lodge, expressing an opinion as to the best way of placing it on a sound basis. One of their recommendations was “ That the Grand Lodge dues of each member be made a separate payment beyond the subscription.” This was adopted, and is still in force, explaining the very unusual amount of our subscription, £4 8s. Another recommendation resulted in the adoption of a resolution on December 6th, 1852, “ That brethren who have formerly been members of this Lodge, but who from circumstances are unable to attend the regular meetings, may be re-admitted subject to an annual subscription of 25s., and a payment of 1 guinea when they dine, such re-admission being in all cases subject to the ballot and usual notice.”

It was under this rule that Bro. E. F. Leeks, and another P.M., Bro.

Harris, were re-elected in February, 1853 (see P27)

For many years—indeed, ever since 1839—the Lodge had been in debt, the balance due to the Treasurer being, in 1849, as much as £65 18s. 8d. In the following year it was about £10 less. In 1851, by dint of merging the Charity Fund, amounting to £25 odd, into the general funds of the Lodge, the deficit was reduced to £4. 15s. 11d.

Judging from the Treasurer’s book, a precedent seems to have existed for this in 1840.

The following paragraph appears in the Committee’s report: — “ Believing that the attendance of some brethren of musical talent contributes very much to the temperate enjoyment of the banquets, ” they “ recommend that the W.M. and Secretary be empowered to

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invite two such brethren to each meeting of this Lodge.” The only indication of this being acted upon is a note in the Cash book of the payment of 3 guineas to a vocalist in 1854. (Vide Appendix C.)

Bro. How was appointed Secretary on April 5th, 1852, and in the following December was elected Treasurer.

During the next two years the financial condition of the Lodge materially improved. At the end of 1853 a balance of £53 odd was carried forward. New members were also accruing, and a report in the “Freemasons’ Quarterly Review” for 1854, referring to the Installation Meeting on February 6th, states that “We are pleased to find this old and respected Lodge is gradually obtaining accession to its strength.” Bro. Bathe is mentioned as “ being now the senior member.” In 1853, Bro. George Lea Wilson was Installed, but at the April meeting it was announced that he “ had been suddenly required to proceed to Sydney, in Australia, and had deputed Bro. How to act in all cases as W.M. of the Lodge during his year of office.”

It would seem that at this period it was the custom in our Lodge to take each candidate separately, for on February 5th, 1855, there were three initiations, of which the first and third were done by Bro. How, and the second by Bro. Stearns. Again, in February, 1862, we find a similar occurrence of three candidates being taken separately.

At this meeting Bro. How proposed, and Bro. Cox seconded: — “ That a Jewell (sic) of a design which was exhibited be presented to each Past Master of the Lodge, and that the expense be defrayed by a subscription of 1 guinea from each member of the Lodge.” This was carried unanimously. The presentation was made on April 2nd. To quote the “ Freemasons’ Quarterly ”: “A Jewel of singularly elegant design was presented to each Past Master, nine in number.

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The form of the Jewel is a golden star, emblematic of the five points of Fellowship, and is, we believe, the first instance of its adoption for a P.M. Jewel.” This is the Jewel the Lodge still presents to its Past Masters. The same journal, when mentioning the presentation of a Jewel to Bro. Bellinger, the I.P.M., in 1856, says: “We take occasion to remark on the extreme elegance of the Unity Jewel, ‘ L’Etoile des Etoiles,’ the P.M. emblem sparkling in brilliants from out the centre of the five points. It is deservedly considered one of the happiest designs of Bro. John Mott Thearle, the Masonic jeweller of Fleet Street.” This Bro. Thearle was a P.M. of the Lodge ; we learn from the Minutes that he was Initiated (and no doubt Passed), in the Frederick Lodge of Unity, No. 661. In October, 1851, he was Raised in our Lodge of Unity, and the same night elected a joining member and appointed Inner Guard. He was J.D. in 1852, S.W. in 1853, and W.M. in 1854. He resigned the Lodge on October 4th, 1858.

In 1855 the Lodge was destined to undergo fresh trouble. At the banquet on February 5th, 1855, the W.M., Bro. Bellinger, in proposing the health of Bro. How, Treasurer and Secretary, is reported by the “Freemasons’ Quarterly Review” to have said that “to his exertions the Lodge was in a great measure indebted for the admirable working of that day’s proceedings, as well as {sic) to his untiring efforts to promote the prosperity of the Lodge, and the happiness of its members.”

Our Minutes, however, record that a meeting of the Permanent Committee was summoned to meet on August 8th, 1855, “ for the purpose of auditing the accounts.” It transpired that the Lodge had been posted by Grand Lodge for the non-payment of dues; that a large sum was owing to the “ London Tavern ”; and that the Past Masters’ jewels had not been paid for. Towards the amount owing,

39

Bro. How had collected about £60, and he “ admitted that he had used that sum for his own private purposes, and, being unable then to repay any portion of it, there was consequently no cash whatever in hand.”

After consideration, it was resolved that Bro. How should give promissory notes for the repayments of the sums appropriated by him, and should insure his life for ^60 as security. There is no record in the Minutes that this resolution was acted upon, and the only reference we can find to a possible repayment is an entry in the Treasurer’s book dated August 8th, 1855 : “To cash, Bro. How’s bill paid 11 th September, £ 13 9s.”

Bro. How resigned his Offices, and was succeeded by Bro. Joseph Stearns and Bro. the Rev. J. E. Cox, as Treasurer and Secretary respectively.

On April 2nd, 1855, “Mr. Charles Winsdale, age forty, of 17, Throgmorton Street, Stockbroker,” was initiated by Bro. How. He was W.M. in 1859, and later was for many years Secretary of the Lodge.

In 1856 the by-laws underwent revision; their confirmation by Grand Lodge was, however, not announced until October, 1857, the delay being due to laxity in the Secretarial Department of that body, which called forth a strongly-worded protest from the Lodge.

The Minutes of December 2nd, 1855, record that at the ballot for W.M., “ the election of Bro. W. Campbell Sleigh (the J.W.) was carried by a majority of one,” presumably over the S.W., Bro. Masterman.

At the next meeting, February 4th, 1856, a curious incident occurred. Bro. Cox was about to Instal the W.M. Elect when he

40

discovered that the warrant was not in the Lodge, and “ as it was impossible to proceed without it,” the Installation was postponed to the following week.

At the meeting in April, Bro. Cox intimated that the books, warrant and other documents belonging to the Lodge “ had been stolen from the London Tavern where he had left them in the custody of Bro. Funge.⁠1 A suspicion evidently existed that some brother was implicated in their disappearance, for the Minutes record that “ every brother then present did solemnly declare upon his solemn obligation, and with his hand upon the Volume of the Sacred Law, that he was not connected with the loss of the warrant, books, etc., aforesaid, and signed a document to be deposited amongst the papers of the Lodge, to the same effect.”

At an Emergency meeting on April 14th, three brethren who were not at the preceding meeting acted in like manner, and it is interesting to note that one of these was Bro. J. How, who would seem therefore to have remained a member of the Lodge, although he does not appear in the Treasurer’s book as paying a subscription.

The Secretary, “ by public advertisement and otherwise,” tried all possible means to recover the missing articles, and in October was able to announce that they “ had been found in an iron safe in the cellar of the London Tavern,’ but how they had come there, there was no evidence to show.” The natural supposition is that Bro. Funge put them there for safety, and had forgotten where they were.

On December 21st, 1857, an Emergency Lodge was “ specially called to initiate Mr. Edward Bell Cox,” the son of the Secretary,

__________

1 * Mr. John Funge, aged 28, of 13, Finsbury Place, Wine Merchant,” was initiated in the Lodge on February 5th, 1855. He was manager of the “London Tavern” in succession to Bro. Bathe, and was W.M. in 1872.

41

“previously to his departure for India.” Being only nineteen years of age, a dispensation was obtained for his initiation. This is the only instance on record of such a proceeding in our Lodge.

In October, 1859, Bro. the Rev. J. E. Cox, resigned the Office of Secretary, being succeeded by Bro. Joseph Stearns.

The following extract from the Minutes of February 6th, 1860, announces the entry into Freemasonry and the Lodge of one of its most distinguished members : “ The name of Mr. John Cooper Forster, of Wellington Street, London Bridge, Surgeon, proposed by Bro. Joseph Stearns, P.M. and Treasurer, seconded by Bro. the Rev. J. E. Cox, P.M., having been duly inserted in the summonses, he was bal- lotted for and unanimously approved, and, being in attendance, he was introduced and initiated into Freemasonry in ancient and solemn form by Bro. Frederick Slight.” He was Passed on April 2nd, and Raised on December 3rd, 1860. Appointed J.D. in February 1861, and S.D. in 1862 ; he was nominated for J.W. at the Installation Meeting, on February 2nd, 1863, but he was not present.

He resigned the Lodge in October, 1863, but was re-elected in October, 1864. At the Installation Meeting, in February, 1865, having been W.M. of No. 162, he Installed the W.M., Bro. W. Mitchell, and on the same day was himself appointed J.W. He was Installed in the Chair of King Solomon on February 5th, 1866, by Bro. Thomas Fenn, Assistant Grand Director of Ceremonies, who is now one of the most distinguished members of Grand Lodge, and justly regarded as the authority in all matters appertaining to the working in English Freemasonry.

Bro. J. Cooper Forster was instrumental in obtaining the warrant for the Centenary Jewel in 1869, the wisdom of which step, however,

42

may be open to criticism, as from the early foundation of the Lodge it was entitled to a Jewel of its own choosing, without of necessity adopting the pattern now obligatory for all Craft Lodges which have completed their Centenary.

Bro. J. Cooper Forster, after a hurried return from the South of France, where he had gone in the hopes of recruiting his health, died in 1886. His death was felt to be a personal loss by every member of the Lodge, of which he, at that time, was “ the Father,” or oldest surviving member. His old-time courtesy was extended to the youngest member of the Lodge, while he encouraged all to perfect themselves in the ceremonies of the Craft, of which he was himself so able an exponent. His Masonic work received recognition from Grand Lodge by his appointment as Junior Grand Deacon.

He was a distinguished member of the medical profession, being senior surgeon to Guy’s Hospital, and President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, in the year 1884.

In 1863, the number of the Lodge was altered from No. 82 to No. 69, and at the meeting on October 5th, among resignations tendered to the Lodge, was that of Bro. J. Cooper Forster. The consideration of this letter was postponed to the next Lodge meeting. At the meeting on December 7th, 1863, the Secretary stated that Bro. J. Cooper Forster still wished to retire from the Lodge.

At the Installation Meeting, in February, 1864, the Lodge declined to grant the Past Master’s Jewel to the retiring W.M., Bro. Charles Florsley. At the meeting in April, 1874, the Secretary read a requisition signed by every subscribing member of the Lodge, with the exception of one who had not been present for three years, requesting Bro. Charles Horsley, P.M., to resign his membership of the

43

Lodge. Bro. Charles Horsley was present, and resigned his membership in open Lodge. It is only fair to his memory to put on record that throughout all the proceedings as recorded in our Minutes, and in the inscribed correspondence, he seems to have acted uprightly and honourably, although unfortunately to have given grave offence to the members of the Lodge, but how or in what way does not appear, while he denied that the Brethren had any cause to be offended with his conduct.

At this Lodge meeting it was proposed by Bro. Joseph Stearns, P.M. and Treasurer, seconded by Bro. J. P. Pittman, P.M., and “by every member present,” “that Bro. J. Cooper Forster do rejoin this Lodge”

In October, 1864, Bro. J. Cooper Forster was unanimously reelected a member.

On the 3rd February, 1862, Mr. Joseph Phillips Stearns, son of Bro. Joseph Stearns, P.M. and Treasurer, was Initiated in the Lodge. He was Passed in April of the same year, and Raised in the following October. He was I.G. in 1863, and S.D. in 1864 and 1865, S.W. in 1866, and W.M. in 1867.

On the death of his father, in 1868, the Office of Treasurer became vacant, and he was unanimously elected to fill it. From that time to this, without a break, he has discharged the duties of Treasurer to the manifest advantage of the Lodge, of which he is at the present time the senior member.

At the Installation Banquet in February, 1894, on the occasion of his completing twenty-five years of Office as Treasurer, he was presented by the brethren with a gold watch, bearing an inscription, as a mark of their esteem and regard.

44

Lodge. Bro. Charles Horsley was present, and resigned his membership in open Lodge. It is only fair to his memory to put on record that throughout all the proceedings as recorded in our Minutes, and in the inscribed correspondence, he seems to have acted uprightly and honourably, although unfortunately to have given grave offence to the members of the Lodge, but how or in what way does not appear, while he denied that the Brethren had any cause to be offended with his conduct.

At this Lodge meeting it was proposed by Bro. Joseph Stearns, P.M. and Treasurer, seconded by Bro. J. P. Pittman, P.M., and “by every member present,” “that Bro. J. Cooper Forster do rejoin this Lodge”

In October, 1864, Bro. J. Cooper Forster was unanimously reelected a member.

On the 3rd February, 1862, Mr. Joseph Phillips Stearns, son of Bro. Joseph Stearns, P.M. and Treasurer, was Initiated in the Lodge. He was Passed in April of the same year, and Raised in the following October. He was I.G. in 1863, and S.D. in 1864 and 1865, S.W. in 1866, and W.M. in 1867.

On the death of his father, in 1868, the Office of Treasurer became vacant, and he was unanimously elected to fill it. From that time to this, without a break, he has discharged the duties of Treasurer to the manifest advantage of the Lodge, of which he is at the present time the senior member.

At the Installation Banquet in February, 1894, on the occasion of his completing twenty-five years of Office as Treasurer, he was presented by the brethren with a gold watch, bearing an inscription, as a mark of their esteem and regard.

45

History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69

46

History of the lodge of unity, No. 69

SYNOPSIS OF EVENTS IN RECENT YEARS TO 1900

1869

February 1st

—Centenary Jewel granted, Warrant obtained by Bro. J. Cooper Forster.

1870

October 3rd 

—Proposed by Bro. J. Cooper Forster, and seconded by Bro. E. V. Morgan, that the Initiation and Joining fees be for the future 25 guineas, unanimously adopted. (No record of this being submitted to Grand Lodge for approval.)

1871

October 2nd 

—Bro. E. V. Morgan, P.M., proposed, and Bro. Godson seconded, that the Lodge be empowered to elect annually one Initiate at the fee of 7 guineas, exclusive of the annual subscription.

—Bro. Lilley proposed, and Bro. J. Funge seconded, that the name and number of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69, be granted for a new Chapter. There is no record of this being carried or put to the Lodge. At the next meeting the proposition was withdrawn.

1871

December 4th

—The W.M. Ruled that in consequence of Bro. E.V. Morgan not being in the Lodge, the motion standing in his name on the summons was lost. Bro. Lilley withdrew his proposition as to Chapter.

Bro. Lilley proposed the following motion to be discussed at the next Lodge meeting:— “ That the Initiation and

47

1871

December 4th

Cont/.

Joining fee be 10 guineas (exclusive of the annual subscription) and whenever the number of members exceeds thirty, the fee shall be 25 guineas for Initiation and Joining, exclusive of the annual subscription.,, Country members to remain as before.

1872

February 5th.

—The above proposition of Bro. Lilley's was put to the Lodge, but an amendment, proposed by Bro. Morgan, and seconded by Bro. J. Cooper Forster, that the number of members should not exceed twenty-five, excluding country members, was carried by a majority of the brethren present. The original motion was withdrawn.

1875

March 18th

—Lodge of Emergency “ in reference to matters about to take place at Albert Hall, South Kensington, on April 28th, when H.R.H. the Prince of Wales will be installed Grand Master of Masons.” Bro. Lilley was appointed Steward to represent the Lodge on that occasion.

1875

April 5th

—Proposed by Bro. E. V. Morgan, and seconded by Bro. Secretary, that Bro. H. Dodwell, S.D. be elected to represent the Lodge as Master Mason at the Albert Hall, on the Installation of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales as Grand Master.

1875

May 3rd 

Emergency meeting to consider the question of the future place of meeting for the Lodge in case the “ London Tavern ” should be sold.

1876

February 7th

Bro. Funge informed the Lodge that the “ London Tavern ” had been disposed of, and that, in consequence the brethren would have to seek accommodation elsewhere. A committee consisting of the W.M., Bro. J. Cooper Forster, Bro. J. Funge, and Bro. Secretary, was formed to confer and report the steps necessary to be taken

48

1876

April 3rd

The Committee reported and the Lodge unamimously decided to remove to the inns of Court Hotel.

Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan proposed, and Bro. Medwin seconded, that in future the Entrance fee to new members be 15 guineas, which was carried unanimously.

Bro. E. V. Morgan proposed, and Bro.Funge seconded, that the By-laws of the Lodge be revised, and that a committee consisting of Bros. J. Cooper Forster, J. P. Stearns, and Charles Winsdale be requested to act accordingly.

1876

October 2nd

—Proposed new By-laws were placed before the meeting.

1876

December 4th 

—New By-laws were adopted. The fee for Initiation being fixed at 15 guineas ⁠1and the Joining fee at 10 guineas. The Visitor's fee being £1 5s

1882

March _

—The death of Bro. Charles Winsdale was reported, and Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan appointed Secretary.

1883

February 2nd

—New collars were supplied, and new chains to replace missing ones, the jewels being repaired, etc., Bro. Henry Thomas was appointed Tyler, succeeding Bro. George Smith, who retired, from ill-health, in 1881, the Lodge having been tyled in the interval by Bro. E. Goddard, as Tyler pro tem.

1885

February 2nd

Proposed by Bro. Charles Haywood, seconded by Bro. Morgan, “ that the Joining fee shall in future be the same as the fee for Initiation." This was carried unanimously. Rule No. 11 in the Lodge By-laws.

1886

April 6th

—Lodge met in mourning, owing to the death of Bro. J. Cooper Forster, P.M. There were no visitors present, the ordinary Masonic banquet was dispensed with, the brethren dining informally together

__________

1 This does not appear ti have been acted upon

49

1886

October 4th

—Mrs. Cooper Forster presented to the Lodge a framed photogravure of her late husband, and his Grand Lodge clothing as P.G. Deacon. The clothing has been fitted in an oaken frame of triptych form, and is exhibited when the Lodge is working.

1890

February 3rd

—The Lodge voted the sum of £13 to the Royal Masonic Institution for Girls, towards defraying the cost of the stained glass window in the Centenary Hall.

In return for this, the Lodge to have two votes in perpetuity, or, in the case of Vice- Presidency, four votes to be allotted to it. A space in the window bears the arms and the number, No. 69, of the Lodge of Unity.

1891

April 4th

—Bro. Geo. F. Marshall acts as “ temporary ” Secretary, owing to the illness of Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan.

1892

February 4th

—Bro. Geo. F. Marshall appointed Secretary.

1892

April 4th

—Ten guineas voted from Lodge funds to present a piece of plate to Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan on his retirement from the post of Secretary through illness.

1894

February 5th

—At the banquet on this evening a gold demi- hunter watch, suitably engraved, was presented by the members of the Lodge to Bro. Joseph Phillips Stearns, in recognition of his services as Treasurer during a period of over twenty-five consecutive years.

1895

February 4th 

—Letter read from Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan, P.M., congratulating the W.M. on the birth of a son, stating that it was an unusual event for a Master to enter the Chair as a bachelor, and leave it at the end of a year of office with a family. He proposed that a silver christening cup, or knife, fork, and spoon, with napkin ring, suitably engraved, be presented to the

50

1895

February 4th

Cont/.

young “ Lewis/' the cost not to exceed 10 guineas. This was seconded by Bro. Treasurer, and carried unanimously. The W.M., Bro. R. J. Reece, presented the Lodge with an I.G. dagger of the sixteenth century in a silver sheath.

1896

March 20th

—Bros. A. E. Stearns, P.M., and S. Lea Smith, P.M., presented the Lodge with a complete set of silver and ivory working tools.

1897

February 1st

—Lodge furniture thoroughly overhauled, cushion recovered, columns repaired, etc.

1897

October 4th

—A piece of silver plate, not exceeding in value 10 guineas, was presented to Bro. Kenyon P. Morgan on his marriage.

1898

February 7th

—Bro. J. P. Stearns proposed, and Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan seconded, that a sum of £89 5 s. be voted from the funds of the Lodge, to qualify it as a Vice-President of the Royal Masonic Institution for Boys, and that the same be placed on the lists of the Stewards representing the Lodge at the Centenary Festival.

1899

February 5th

—Bro. E. Vaughan Morgan proposed, and Bro. T. A. Ives Howell seconded, that the Initiation and Joining fees be raised to 30 guineas. An amendment proposed by Bro. R. J. Reece and seconded by Bro. E. H. Cartwright, that the By-laws be revised and that no further candidates be proposed until this be done, was carried.

A committee was appointed to select a suitable place for the Lodge to meet in future, which reported unanimously in favour of the Westminster Palace Hotel, and it resolved to petition the Grand Master to give his usual consent to the the removal of the Lodge to that address.

51

1899

October 2nd

—The Lodge met at the Westminster Palace Hotel. The Committee reported on the revised By-laws, submitting a draft set of the same, which were unanimously adopted by the Lodge, and later received the sanction of Grand Lodge.

At the banquet on this evening a Zeiss Field Glass was presented by the members to Bro. Edward Ansted, P.M., in recognition of his kindness in serving as I.G. to the Lodge for seven consecutive years.

1900

October 1st

—Two dozen Firing Glasses, made to a pattern that had been used in the Lodge for sixty years, were presented by Bros. A. E. Stearns and A. W. Stearns.

History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69

52

History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69

APPENDIX A.—Fees and Subscriptions.

 In 1764, as mentioned on a previous page, the Joining fee was 3s. 6d., and the “ contributions ” 3s. a quarter.

No further information is available until 1837, when the entries in the Treasurer’s book commence. At that time the Initiation fee was 4^ guineas and the Joining Fee half a guinea. Out of these amounts it appears that 10s. 6d. in the case of initiation and 5 s. in joining were paid into a Charity Fund.

The subscription was then £2 per annum, which was altered to 2 guineas in November, 1838. That there was also a country subscription is shown by the fact that on March 27th, 1838, “ Bro. Beet- ham announced his wish to be altered from a country member to a regular member ”; what its amount was we are unable to discover.

The Minutes record that in January, 1838, the Initiation fee was raised to 5 guineas and the Joining fee to 2 guineas. Out of the former sum 10s. 6d. went to the Charity Fund as before; whether the amount in the case of Joining was altered or not, we cannot ascertain. In 1841 the Initiation fee became 6 guineas, in addition to which, as the Treasurer’s book shows, 10s. 6d. had, at first, to be paid to the Charity Fund. No evidence of a corresponding change in the Joining fee is to be found. We gather from the cash book entries that,

53

after 1842, the extra payments towards the Charity Fund ceased, and that the fund was afterwards kept up by collections made at the several meetings.

  • In 1850 the Initiation fee was made 7 guineas and the Joining 5 guineas.
  • In 1876 the Initiation fee was raised to 15 guineas and the Joining to 10 guineas.
  • In 1885 it was resolved that the Joining fee should in future be the same as the Initiation fee, viz., £10 10s. These are the present fees of the Lodge.

The subscription was raised in 1841 to 3 guineas, and in 1852 the Grand Lodge dues were made a separate payment, so that the subscription practically became £3 7s. In 1874 another guinea was added, making it £\ 8s., at which sum it still remains.

The reduced subscription of £1 5s. for members unable to attend regularly, which was introduced in December 1852 {vide supra, p. 37), is, curiously enough, not provided for in the printed By-laws of 1856, but it evidently continued in force, for in 1858, Bro. Funge and in 1861, Bro. Cox, were placed on this footing.

It may be noted that in 1838 a resolution was passed “ That in order to keep the Lodge out of debt . . . the W.M. . . . may order each brother attending the banquet ... to pay 15 s. to the funds of the Lodge.”

The only indication of this being acted upon is the record in the Treasurers book of the brethren paying an extra 10s. per head towards the banquet of April 7th, 1856.

With regard to the fee to be paid for a visitor, we find that in 1838 this was 5s. In 1852 it had gone up to 15s., but we cannot trace the date of the alteration. In 1856 it was raised to 21s., and in 1876 to 25 s. In the new by-laws, recently passed, it has been reduced to a guinea.

54

APPENDIX B.—By-Laws.

During the period covered by our extant minutes, general revisions of the by-laws took place in 1856, 1876, and 1899.

Naturally, from time to time, various alterations and additions were made by resolutions duly carried in Lodge, which were usually the result of recommendations of the Permanent Committee.

It is unnecessary to tabulate these here; the more important have been mentioned in their proper sequence in the preceding pages.

55

APPENDIX C.—The Financial Progress of
the Lodge from 1837.

Our sources of information on this matter are the Treasurer’s cash accounts, which exist from 1837 onwards, and sundry reports of the Permanent Committee that are entered in the Minutes.

The simplest way of showing the financial position in successive years is to tabulate the balances as they appear in the cash book, but it must be kept in mind that, in this book, no account is taken of arrears, which would, in some cases, especially prior to 1855, considerably modify the position.

CASH BALANCES.

Year

Due to Treasurer

In Treasurer’s Hands

Invested

1837

£3 15s 7d

---

---

1838

---

£5 4s 11d

---

1839

---

£20 2s 5d

---

1840

£3 10s 4d

---

---

1841

£22 0s 4d

---

---

1842

£28 8s 0d

---

---

56

Year.

Due to Treasurer

In Treasurer’s Hands

Invested

1843

 £28 17s 6d

---

---

1844

… 

£38 17s 0d

…  

---

---

1845

 £14 13s 8d

---

---

1846

…  

£23 18s 4d

---

---

1847

£39 7s 8d

---

---

1848

£63 13s 2d

---

---

1849

£65 18s 8d

---

---

1850

£56 19s 5d

---

---

1851

£4 15s 11d

… 

---

---

1852

---

 £12 4s 6d

---

1853

---

£53 6s 6d

---

1854

---

£ 49 5s 6d

---

1855

---

£24 2s 7d

---

1856

£2 19s 2d

---

---

1857

---

£41 2s 10d

---

1858-9

---

£40 16s 4d

---

1860

---

£90 15s 1d

---

1861

---

£76 5s 1d

---

57

1862

---

£111 3s 2d

---

1863

---

£133 11s 7d

---

1864

---

£121 1s 10d

---

1865

---

£133 4s 9d

---

1866

---

£114 6s 6d

---

1867

---

£115 11s 1d

---

1868

---

£93 4s 1d

---

1869

---

£131 18s 10d

---

1870-1-2

---

£99 2s 2d

---

1873

---

£89 12s 8d

---

1874-5

---

£131 2s 2d

---

1876

---

£85 10s 5d

---

1877

---

£96 6s 5d

---
58

CASH BALANCES  ---- Continued

Year.

Due to Treasurer

In Treasurer’s Hands

Invested

1878

---

£148 16s 3d

---

1879

---

£154 13s 9d

---

1880

---

£188 6s 3d

---

1881-2

---

£213 14s 3d

---

1883

---

£246 15s 10d

---

1884

---

£257 7s 2d

---

1885

---

£282 15s 2d

---

1886

---

£295 10s 8d

---

1887

---

£306 11s 2d

---

1888

---

£336 1s 7d

---

1889

---

£342 3s 11d

---

1890

---

£255 16s 7d *⁠1

---

1891

---

£256 15s 3d

---

1892

---

£333 1s 0d

---

1893

---

£335 12s 6d

Consoles

1894

---

£240 4s 9d

£150 0s 0d

1895

---

£163 2s 5d

£250 0s 0d

1896

---

£236 14s 3d

£250 0s 0d

1897

---

£273 12s 1d

£250 0s 0d

1898

---

£261 9s 2d **⁠2

£250 0s 0d

1899

---

£283 12s 2d

£250 0s 0d

It is interesting to note the dates of appointment of the several Treasurers during the period under review :-

  • Bro. R. Lea Wilson was appointed in  January, 1839.
  • Bro. Jeremiah How „ ,, October, 1852.
  • Bro. Joseph Stearns ,, „  August, 1855.
  • and Bro. J. P. Stearns (on the death of his father) in 1868.

__________

1 * In this year £68 5s was given to the R.M.I. for Girls to complete Vice-Presidency and £13 towards Window Fund, a pane in which bears the arms of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69

2 ** £89 5s given to the R.M.I. for Boys this year to complete Vice-Presidency.

59

Our Minutes take us back a year further than the above tables, and it is recorded that in 1836 the Committee reported that the Treasurer held a “ balance on account of Lodge Funds of £15 3s. 0d., in addition to which he holds, on account of the Charity Fund, £9 9s.” They expressed their regret at the large amount of arrears, viz., £39 15s., and concluded by congratulating the Lodge on its favourable prospects.

In January, 1838, we read, in the report, “that your Committee . . . find a balance due to the Treasurer of £3 15s. 7d. on the General Fund, and that there is in his hands a balance of £12 18s. 6d. on account of the Charity Fund. . . . Your Committee find the amount of outstanding debts which they consider good to be ^23 4s., which they strenuously recommend to be immediately collected.”

In January, 1839, the balance on the General Fund was £5 4s. 11d. and the Charity Fund £17 13s. The arrears now stood at £8, but since the last report, six brethren, owing in the aggregate £28 10s, had been erased; at the end of the year the Lodge was £20 2s. 5d. to the good.

In October, 1840, it appears from an entry in the Treasurer’s book that a sum of £23 2s. from the Charity Fund was merged in the General Fund, evidently in consequence of the bad state of the finances; in spite of this, the year ended with an adverse balance.

For the next twelve years the balance was consistently against the Lodge, sometimes to a very considerable amount.

Seeing that the commencement of this unsatisfactory state of affairs coincides with the appointment of Bro. R. Lea Wilson as Treasurer, it might at first be thought that he was to blame.

A more careful examination shows that, although he may have been at fault in letting arrears accumulate, or in not keeping a check

60

on the banqueting expenditure, the real cause was the substitution of dinner for supper without a sufficient increase in the subscription; this took place at the end of 1839. During that year the funds were kept up by a large influx of new members, but when this source of income fell off, the funds went down.

During 1837 and 1838 the items of receipt and expenditure are entered in full detail and the accounts were duly audited From 1839 to the end of 1842 Bro. Wilson kept them in the same detail but without an audit until the end of the latter year, when the certificate reads, “ All accounts to this date duly audited by the Permanent Committee.” This is signed by Bros. Udall, W.M., and William Vink, P.M. In and after the following year, he ceased, however, to give details of receipts, which are entered in lump sums, on the dates of the various meetings, under the heads of “ Cash collected ” and “ Charity.” The items of expenditure appear to be entered, as before, in detail. An audit certificate signed by the W.M. and two P.M’s. is appended to the accounts of 1843, but for the rest of Bro. Wilson’s term, viz., until the end of 1851, the audit is vouched for each year by the signature of the W.M. only.

When Bro. Wilson resigned, in February, 1852, it was resolved, on the recommendation of the Permanent Committee, to reduce the deficit by merging the Charity Fund, amounting to £25 8s. 4d., in the General Fund. Even then the Lodge was still in debt to their late Treasurer in the sum of £4. 15s. 11d. There is no evidence that this was ever repaid to him. His successor, Bro. How, appears to have kept his accounts, so far as they were a record of cash received and spent, with a thoroughly satisfactory attention to detail, and, with the help of a goodly number of Initiations, the balance, under his care, attained to a very respectable figure. But in 1855, as already recounted, his period of office came to a disastrous termination. He

61

had, unfortunately, made use of £59 15 s. 6d. of the Lodge money, which he was unable to repay, and the Lodge was in debt to the extent of about £77, its only assets being 10s. handed over by Bro. How, and arrears of £34 is.

The only record of any repayment by Bro. How is an item of £13 9s. on August 8th, 1855, it is also to be noted that during his Treasurership, his accounts do not show that he ever paid his own subscription.

In 1856, in consequence, no doubt, of the state of the funds, the cash book shows that the brethren present on April 7th paid an extra 10s. per head towards the banquet. It is also recorded that on the same occasion, Bro. Sleigh, the W.M. paid £2 10s. for champagne.

The following year there was a good balance in hand, and, as will be seen by the above table, this, under the fostering care of Bro. Joseph Stearns and Bro. J. P. Stearns, our present revered Treasurer, has been more than maintained in every succeeding year, until, in 1899, we have a balance of £283 12s. 2d., in addition to ^250 in Consols. The Lodge has also qualified as Vice-President of each of the three great Masonic Charities.

The custom of the W.M. paying for the champagne on the night of his Installation was in existence prior to 1869, but we are unable to state the exact date at which it was instituted.

The following items appearing in the Treasurer’s book may be of some slight interest: —

1837

Mar. 10th

Jewel (Master of Ceremonies)

£ 1 10s 0d

1838

May 30th

Treasurer’s Jewel, etc.

£1 15s 0d

1839

Jan. 28th

13 New Collars

£6 10s 0d

1853

Aug. 1st 

By Croydon Lodge. 3 Banquets

£2 5 0d

1854

April 11th

Bro. Herbert, Vocalist

£3 3s 0d

1856

Feb. 4th 

Bro. Thearle’s bill, P.M. Jewels ...

£21 12s 0d

1858

Oct. 4th 

Smith (Tyler), for finding lost Bible

£0 2s 6d

1864

July 22nd

Mr. Brown, box for tracing boards

£1 11s 6d

  “

April 6th

Mr. Knowles, 3 new tracing boards

£7 0s 0d

1866

Feb. 24th

Powell, portmanteau for Lodge Books

£1 0s 0d

1869

Oct. 1st

Bro. Crawley, new set of gavels ...

£1 1s 0d

  “

Jan. 15th

Centenary Warrant...

£5 5s 0d

  “

Feb. 3rd

P.M. Jewel 30s. Collar 10s *

£2 0s 0d

  “

Frame for Centenary Warrant

£1 10s 0d

1888

May 16th

Haseler, Collar for Bro. Harpour (Bro. Organist) 

£2 10s 0d

62

APPENDIX D.— Note on the Charity Fund
of the Lodge.

It may be interesting to collect together here, the various scraps of information on this subject, which are scattered through the foregoing pages.

We learn from the Treasurer’s book that, in 1837, 10s. 6d. from every Initiation fee, and 5 s. from every Joining fee, was set aside for this fund. So far as this source of information goes, the arrangement appears to have continued in force until 1841, and, with a slight modification, for a year longer. There is no record of any change or reorganisation of the fund having taken place in 1839.

However, in the Minutes of December 4th, 1848, it is recorded the following “ addition to By-law 13 ” was carried, viz., “ That whenever the amount in hand (i.e., to the credit of the Charity Fund) shall exceed £20, any amount not exceeding one half, may, by resolution of the Lodge . . . be . . . voted ... to any decayed or necessitous brother who shall have been a member of the Lodge since the

63

formation of the fund, viz., 1839, but no sum larger than one guinea shall be voted for the relief of any other brother; for any other purpose, and whenever the fund shall be below the £20, nothing more can be voted out of it again until it exceed that sum, except subscription to the Charities.” The reference to 1839 is puzzling, and we can offer no explanation of it.

Notwithstanding the above-quoted resolution, it would appear from an entry in the cash book, that in 1840 the fund was merged in the General Fund of the Lodge, and the same thing was again done in 1851.

It may be noted that on both these occasions the cash book entry uses the expression “ Benevolence Fund,” while, in referring to contributions to the fund, the term ‘‘Charity Fund” is employed.

It might be thought, therefore, that two separate funds were in existence, but we can find nothing to support such a view, and moreover in the Minute book, when the resolution anent the second merging in 1851, is recorded, the fund is referred to as the “ Charity Fund”

This fund, in December, 1899, amounted to £12 12s.

64

APPENDIX E - List of the Principal Lodge Officers, Treasurers and Secretaries of the Lodge of Unity No 69

From 1819 to 1836 we are dependent for names on the Grand Lodge Signature Books, which were instituted in the former year, and in which the Principal Officers of every London Lodge had to sign their names in order to secure admission to meetings of Grand Lodge. The entries are not always complete, nor, as already shown, are they always to be depended upon. These books were abolished in September, 1899. From the year 1836 the Minute Books are available.

Date

Master

Senior Warden

Junior Warden

Treasurer

Secretary

1819

William Jennings

Alexander Bengo

Thomas Levens

-

-

1820

William Jennings

J. Late

L. Godfrey

-

-

1821

L. Godfrey

J. Late

Thomas Levens

-

-

1822

L. Godfrey

-

William Bishop

-

-

1823

Sam Mayhew

Geo. Skelton

-

-

-

1824

Sam Mayhew

Geo. Skelton 

-

-

-

1825

Geo. Skelton

-

Wm. Jno. Gardey .

-

-

1826

Geo. Murphy

Wm. Jno. Gardey 

Geo. Bateman 

-

-

1827

Wm. Jno. Gardey

Geo. Bateman .

David Stephens

-

-

1828

Geo. Bateman

David Stephens 

Jno. Wigginton 

-

-

1829

David Stephens

Jno. Wigginton 

Jno. R. Stringer 

-

-

1830

Jno. Wigginton

Jno. R. Stringer

Thos. Probyn

-

-

1831

Sam Mayhew

Thos. Probyn 

-

-

-

1832

Thos. Probyn

-

-

-

-

1833

Geo. Aarons

Jno. R. Stringer . . .

J. J. Wheatley

-

-

1834

J. J. Wheatley

Rev. H. Gehle . . .

-

-

-

1835

Rev. H. Gefle

-

Solomon Aarons

-

-

1836

Jno. Jones

Solomon Aarons

Greville Jones

Rev. H. Gehle 

Ed. Wilson

1837

Greville Jones

Richd.Baker

Owen Richards

Rev. H. Gehle 

Ed. Wilson

1838

Richard Baker

Owen Richards

P. Wm. H. Vink

Rev. H. Gehle 

Ed. Wilson

65

Date

Master

Senior Warden

Junior Warden

Treasurer

Secretary

1839

Owen Richards

Ed. Fred. Leeks 

Chas. Ross Terrill 

R. Lea Wilson

Ed. Wilson

1840

P. Wm. H. Vink 

Ed. Fred. Leeks 

Fred. Vink 

R. Lea Wilson

Ed. Wilson

1841

Ed. Fred. Leeks 

Fred. Vink 

Jas. Vickers 

R. Lea Wilson

Ed. Wilson

1842

Jno. Udall 

Fred. Vink 

Jas. Vickers.

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1843

Fred. Vink 

Jas. Vickers

Jas. Clark

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1844

Jas. Vickers 

Ed. Vickers 

Hy. Brn. Walmsley

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1845

Ed. Vickers 

Hy. Brn. Walmsley

Jno. Mason 

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1846

Hy. Brn. Walmsley

Jno. Mason 

Rev. Jno. Edmund Cox

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1847

Rev. Jno. Edmund Cox

Jos. Stearns

Hy. Harriss.

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1848

Joseph Stearns 

Hy. Harris 

Jas. Pope Pittmann 

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1849

Hy. Harris 

J. P. Pittmann 

Rev. Ed. Moore

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1850

Jas. P. Pittmann 

Rev. Ed. Moore 

Jas. Robins 

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson

1851

Jeremiah How 

Jas. Robins 

Chas. Beaumont

R. Lea Wilson

R. Lea Wilson⁠1

1852

Jas. Robins 

Chas. Beaumont 

Geo. Lea Wilson 

Jeremiah How

Jeremiah How

1853

Geo. Lea Wilson 

Jno. Mott Thearle 

A. Lyons Bellinger 

Jeremiah How

Jeremiah How

1854

J. Mott Thearle 

A. L. Bellinger 

Chas. T. Masterman

Jeremiah How

Jeremiah How⁠2

1855

A. L. Bellinger 

Chas. T. Masterman

Wm. C. Sleigh 

Jos. Stearns

J. E. Cox

1856

Wm. C. Sleigh 

Fred. Slight.

Jno. Hy. Anderson

Jos. Stearns

J. E. Cox

1857

J. Hy. Anderson 

W. H. Watts.

Chas. Winsdale 

Jos. Stearns

J. E. Cox

1858

W. H. Watts 

Chas. Winsdale 

Chas. Sawbridge. 

Jos. Stearns

J. E. Cox

1859

Chas. Winsdale

Chas. Sawbridge. 

Thos. Ruston. 

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns

1860

Chas. Sawbridge 

Thos. Ruston. 

Jas. N. Gozen 

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns

1861

Thos. Ruston 

Wm. Jas. Dunsford.

Chas. Horsley 

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns

1862

Wm. Jas. Dunsford 

Chas. Horsley

Jno. Hy. Doyle 

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns

1863

Chas. Horsley 

Jno. Hy. Doyle 

J. Cooper Forster⁠3

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns

1864

Jno. Hy. Doyle

Wm. Mitchell

Geo. H. Farrington

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns

1865

Wm. Mitchell

Geo. H. Farrington

J. Cooper Forster

Jos. Stearns

Jos. Stearns⁠4

1866

J. Cooper Forster

J. P. Stearns

Aaron Geo. Medwin

Jos. Stearns⁠5

Chas. Winsdale

1867

J. P. Stearns

A. G. Medwin

E. Reynolds Ray

Jos. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1868

A. G. Medwin

E. Reynolds Ray

Ed. Vaughan Morgan

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1869

E. Vaughan Morgan

F. J. Lilley

Jno. Rowland

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1870

F. J. Lilley

Jno. Rowland

Ar. E Stearns

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

__________

1 Resigned the Lodge.

2 Resigned Office at the request of the Permanent Committee.

3 Appointed but not invested, and resigned the Lodge during the year

4 Resigned Office, not being permitted to hold both Offices by Grand Lodge.

5 Died in Office

66

Date

Master

Senior Warden

Junior Warden

Treasurer

Secretary

1871

Ar. E. Stearns

Jno. Funge

Wm. Dryland

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1872

Jno. Funge

Wm. Dryland 

Godson Godson

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1873

Jno. Dryland

Godson Godson

Hy. S. Saunderson

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1874

Godson Godson 

Hy. S. Saunderson

Ebenezer Dawson 

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1875

Hy. S. Sanderson

Percival Reed

Thos. Fry

f. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1876

Percival Reed

Thos. Fry

W. H. Dodwell 

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1877 

Thos. Fry

W. H. Dodwell

Wm. E. S. Saunderson

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1878

W. H. Dodwell 

W. E. S. Saunderson

Wm. Shepherd 

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1879

W. E. S. Saunderson

Wm. Shepherd 

Geo. Roper

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1880

Wm. Shepherd

Geo. Roper 

Arthur Roper

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale

1881

Geo. Roper 

Ar. Roper

Chas. Kibble 

J. P. Stearns

Chas. Winsdale⁠1

1882

Geo. Roper 

Ar. Roper

Chas. Kibble 

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1883

Ar. Roper

Chas. Kibble

Chas. Haywood 

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1884

Chas. Kibble

Chas. Haywood 

Geo. F. Marshall 

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1885

Chas. Haywood 

Geo. F. Marshall 

A. Roper (P.M.)

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1886

Geo. F. Marshall 

A. Roper (P.M.) 

T. A. Ives Plowell 

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1887

E. Reynolds Ray

T. A. Ives Howell 

Chas. Kibble (P.M.)

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1888

T. A. Ives Howell

A. G. Med win (P.M.)

Ed. Ansted 

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1889 

Ed. Ansted

Jas. Graves

Bernard Gardner

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan

1890 

Jas. Graves 

Bernard Gardner

Fred. Graves 

J. P. Stearns

E. V. Morgan⁠2

1891 

Bernard Gardner 

Fred. Graves

G. Cosby Harpour 

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1892 

Fred. Graves 

G. Cosby Harpour 

Rd. Jas. Reece 

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1893

G. Cosby Harpour 

Rd. Jas. Reece 

Sdny. Lea Smith

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1894

Rd. Jas. Reece 

Sdny. Lea Smith 

Ar. Leonard Roper

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1895 

Sdny. Lea Smith 

Ar. Leonard Roper

Ernest Hy. Cartwright

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

189b 

Ernest Hy. Cartwright

D’Arcy Chaytor 

Ar. Woodburn Stearns

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1897

Ar. Woodburn Stearns

Hy. Jno. Calder. 

Sdny. MoncktonCopeman

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1898

D’Arcy Chaytor 

Sdny. Monckton Copeman

A. W. Thorburn Steer

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1899

Hy. Jno. Calder

Sdny. MoncktonCopeman

Leonard C. Dobson

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

1900

Sdny. Monckton Copeman

Leonard C. Dobson

Wm. Jno. Gow 

J. P. Stearns

G. F. Marshall

__________

1 Died in Office

2 Resigned through illness

67

APPENDIX F - Lodges of Unity and Unity Lodges

Those founded before the union of the Grand Lodges in 1813 : —

Lodge

Place

Date

Present No.

Unity

London

1742

69

Lowestoft

1747

71

Ringwood Hants

1764

132

London

1769

183

Macclesfield

1788

267

Crewe Chester

1806

321

At the date of the Union there were besides : —

Lodge

Place

Date

Extinct Before

Unity

Oldham

1732

1863

Creation

1758

1832

Longnor

1787

Yarmouth

1793

Guernsey

1809

Lodges founded since the union which have adopted the title of  “Unity,” and which are existing : —

Lodge

Place

Date

No.

Unity

Wareham

1827

386

Warwick

1847

567

Southport

1853

613

Crediton

1870

1332

Great Stanmore

1876

1637

Oldham

1880

1868

68

THE LODGE OF UNITY, No. 69. 

List of Members, October 1st, 1900. 

Date of

Initiation or joining

1862

3rd February

JOSEPH PHILLIPS STEARNS

1865

4th December

EDWARD REYNOLDS RAY

1867

4th February

EDWARD VAUGHAN MORGAN

1868

7th December

ARTHUR EDMUND STEARNS

1880

4th October

GEORGE FREDERICK MARSHALL

1882

2nd October

* THOMAS ARTHUR IVES HOWELL

1884

6th October

EDWARD ANSTED

1885.

5th October

* JAMES GRAVES

1892

1st February

* RICHARD JAMES REECE

1892

1st February

* SYDNEY LEA SMITH

1893

6th February

* ERNEST HENRY CARTWRIGHT

1894

3rd December

D’ARCY CHAYTOR

1895

7th October

ARTHUR WOODBURNE STEARNS

1895

2nd December

HENRY JOHN CALDER

1896

3rd February

SIDNEY MONCKTON COPEMAN.

1896

3rd February

KENYON VAUGHAN-MORGAN

1897

1st February

* ARTHUR WILLIAM THORBURN STEER

1897

6th December

LEONARD CHARLES TALBOT DOBSON

1898

4th April

* WILLIAM JOHN GOW

1898

3rd October

CHARLES CALDECOTT

1899

6th February

* FRANCIS ALFRED HUGH WALSH

1899

4th December

HARRY JAMES SHEPARD

1899

4th December

* HARRY GRINLING

1900

12th February

JOHN CHARLES POTTER

1900

2nd April

* HARRY PERCY BOORD

R. B. WHITEMAN, Tyler.

* Denotes Joining Member.

69

70

BY-LAWS.

LODGE OF UNITY, No. 69.

Founded A.D. 1742.

 

71

This Page intentionally left blank

 

72

History of the Lodge of Unity, No. 69 

 

BY-LAWS

LODGE OF UNITY, No 69.

FOUNDED A.D. 1742.

 Meetings.

No. 1.—The Lodge shall meet at the Westminster Palace Hotel, Victoria Street, Westminster, S.W., on the first Monday in the months of October, December, February, and April in each year, at such hour as the W.M. shall appoint.

After each meeting there shall be a banquet, unless the W.M. otherwise directs.

 Election of Officers.

No. 2.—The Worshipful Master, Treasurer and Tyler shall be elected annually at the regular meeting in December, and the W.M. shall be installed at the regular meeting in the following February.

73

Lodges of Emergency.

No. 3.—When Lodges of Emergency are summoned for transacting the general business of the Lodge, the expenses thereof shall be defrayed by the Lodge from the general funds; but when called for the purpose of conferring degrees on candidates by their own, or any member’s, request the expenses shall be defrayed by such candidate or member.

Election of Members.

No. 4.—In every ballot for election to membership of the Lodge two negatives shall exclude.

Candidates for Initiation.

No. 5.—If a candidate for Initiation fail to present himself at or before the third regular meeting of the Lodge after his election, such election shall be void.

Fees and Subscriptions.

No. 6.—The fee for Initiation shall be ten guineas, and the joining fee ten guineas, both exclusive of the annual subscription and Grand Lodge dues.

The annual subscription shall be £4. 8s., which includes the 4s. quarterage due to Grand Lodge, and shall be payable in advance at the regular meeting in October.

Members elected at or after the February meeting shall be required to pay only half the usual subscription for the current year.

74

Honorary Members.

No. 7.—The Lodge may, by a unanimous vote at a regular meeting, elect any brother to be an honorary member. Such member shall have no right to vote or hold office, but shall be entitled to attend the banquets on payment of one guinea each time. No honorary member shall be entitled to visit the Lodge more than once, unless he be a subscribing member of some Lodge. (See Rule 152 Book of Constitutions.)

Country Members.

No. 8.—A member may, by permission of the Lodge, be placed on the Country List, and shall then pay an annual subscription of 25s. This shall not include the cost of banquets, for which such member shall pay one guinea each time he dines.

Visitor’s Fee.

No. 9.— The fee for a visitor attending the banquet shall be one guinea, payable by the member who vouches for him.

Members in Arrear.

No. 10.—No member of the Lodge shall be entitled to vote or to be elected or appointed to any office until his fee, arrears and subscription for the current year are paid ; and if any member shall omit for one year or more to pay his annual subscription, he shall be liable to be excluded from the Lodge under Rule 210, Book of Constitutions.

Resignation.

No. 11.—Any member desirous of withdrawing from the Lodge shall signify his intention either in open Lodge, or in writing to the

75

Secretary, previous to the regular meeting in October; and upon discharging any arrears due from him he shall be entitled to a clearance certificate.

Treasurer.

No. 12.—The Treasurer shall receive and hold all monies of the Lodge, and shall discharge bills and produce vouchers for the same.

The accounts shall be audited at the regular meeting in December by a Committee consisting of the W.M., Past Masters, Wardens and Secretary, of whom at least three must be present and sign the report.

Secretary.

No. 13.—The Secretary shall issue summonses to every subscribing member of the Lodge, and to the Tyler, at least seven days before each meeting. In all other respects he shall perform the duties of his office as laid down in the Book of Constitutions.

Motions.

No. 14.—Every motion must be proposed and seconded in open Lodge, notice of such motion having been given at a previous meeting, or sent to the Secretary in time to be inserted in the summons for the meeting at which it is to be brought forward.

Furniture, Jewels, etc.

No. 15.—The Furniture, Jewels, and other property of the Lodge shall be insured for an adequate sum, and an inventory of them, verified by the Audit Committee, shall be handed over by each W.M.

76

to his successor. An officer may take away his collar or jewel if he wishes to do so, but he will be held responsible for their safe return.

Notices.

No. 16.—Except in cases otherwise provided for by the Constitutions, notices shall be deemed to have been served if posted to the last known address of the member.

Alteration of By-laws.

No. 17.—No alteration in, or addition to, these By-laws shall be made except by a resolution duly brought forward at a regular meeting of the Lodge, and carried by a majority of two-thirds of those present and voting.

 

Approved by the M. W. Grand Master,

(Signed) E. LETCHWORTH, G.S.

20th November 1899

 

 

History of The Lodge of Unity, No. 69

 

77

CHART OF DAUGHTER LODGES

78

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